From the monthly archives: "August 2015"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Luna moth
Location: Wytheville VA mountains
August 31, 2015 2:59 pm
This beauty was on our car bumper when we overnighted in Wytheville VA in early August. I thought it was so beautiful. I’d never seen one before. Unfortunately it was injured, missing 1 antenna. It was barely moving when I placed it on the ground. FB friends identified it for me.
Signature: Jane Price

Luna Moth

Luna Moth

Dear Jane,
The remaining plumose antenna indicates that this is a male Luna Moth.  Luna Moths do not eat as adults, and they live solely to reproduce.  The male spends his adult life searching for a mate, and once mated, he has fulfilled his purpose.  The mated female Luna Moth’s sole purpose is to search for the appropriate food for her brood and to lay her eggs on, according to BugGuide, leaves from trees:  “including white birch (
Betula papyrifera), persimmon (Diospyros virginiana), sweet gum (Liquidambar styraciflua), hickories (Carya), walnuts (Juglans), pecans, and sumacs (Rhus).”  We would like to think that your male Luna Moth fulfilled his purpose.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Pinecone-like Cocoon
Location:  Jacksonville, FL
August 27, 2015
Hi Bugman,
Today I found this
2 1/2″ long cocoon on a cedar tree.  It’s a brilliantly designed and constructed little pinecone-like structure. (It also reminds me of a log cabin.)
Would you please identify it for me?
Thank you,
L Welch

Bagworm Cocoon

Bagworm Cocoon

Dear L Welch,
This is the cocoon of a Bagworm, a species of moth in the family Psychidae.  A Bagworm Caterpillar constructs a shelter from silk and bits of the plants upon which it is feeding, enlarging the bag as the caterpillar grows.  The caterpillar never leaves the bag, and eventually pupates inside the bag.  Your Bagworm is in the pupal stage, as it is no longer mobile.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Identify a spider
Location: Gonagaldeniya, sri lanka.
August 30, 2015 8:33 am
Dear bugman, i want to identify this spider. He lived under the roof of our house. We are in the wet zone. And sri lanka is a tropical counrty. He builds a strong and sticky web..
Thank you!
Signature: Tharindu Dilshan

Orbweaver

Oval St. Andrew’s Cross Spider

Dear Tharindu,
Your spider is an Orbweaver, and we believe it is in the genus
Argiope.  Large Orbweavers are capable of biting people, but they are docile spiders that rarely leave their webs, and the bite is not considered dangerous.  Thanks to images posted to WongChunXing.com, we believe you have an Oval St. Andrew’s Cross Spider, Argiope aemula.  According to A Guide to Common Singapore Spiders on Habitat News:  “Unlike many other Argiope spiders, the abdomen is oval. Argiope spiders make webs which are suspended vertically 1-2 metres from the ground, the web of mature female spiders of this genus can be easily recognised by the X-shaped zigzag bands of white silk in the centre of the web.”

Orbweaver

Oval St. Andrew’s Cross Spider

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Huge fly out cicada?
Location: NW Iowa
August 30, 2015 8:26 pm
Found this sitting outside camper in Iowa and got a picture after the wife freaked out. Is this a horse fly?
Signature: Curious in Iowa

Female Black Horse Fly

Female Black Horse Fly

Dear Curious in Iowa,
Because of the spacing between the eyes, one can tell that this Black Horse Fly,
Tabanus atratus, is a female.  Only female Horse Flies bite and suck blood from mammals, and if they cannot find a four footed host, they will bite humans.  According to BugGuide:  “Although Tabanus atratus do not often bite humans, when it does happen it leaves painful memories. This fly can also transmit bacterial, viral, and other diseases such as surra and anthrax, to both humans and other animals through its bite.  The effect of T. atratus on livestock can be a serious problem. Blood loss and irritation from the flies can severely affect beef and milk production, as well as grazing. Livestock usually have no way of avoiding the painful bites, and millions of dollars have been spent trying to control these pests. (Long 2001)”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Large beetle – central Ontario
Location: Parry Sound, ON
August 31, 2015 3:40 am
Trying to ID this beauty. Spotted in a well-treed residential area adjacent to a forest. Thanks!
Signature: Jason

Odor of Leather Beetle

Odor of Leather Beetle

Dear Jason,
We verified the identity of your Scarab Beetle as a Hermit Beetle or Odor of Leather Beetle,
Osmoderma eremicola, thanks to the images posted on BugGuide where it states the habitat is:  “rotten logs in woodlands and orchards; adults nocturnal, come to lights.”

Cool. It’s so big. Thanks!

It is the time of the month to select a Bug of the Month for September 2015, and because we are intrigued that BugGuide indicates that the Hermit Beetle gets its other common name “for strong odor of ‘Russian Leather,'” it is a worthy subject to feature next month.  The Backyard Arthropod Project notes:  ” The thing is, the way people talk about it, the odor is supposed to be really strong and noticeable, but with this one it is practically nonexistent.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: I love this spider in PA
Location: Skippack, PA
August 30, 2015 6:36 pm
I saw the spider while I was out jogging and I have never seen anything like it. I am in Pennsylvania not far from Philadelphia, in the suburbs you may say near a wooded area. It looks like it was carrying babies.
Please could you help me identify please could you help me identify us it.
Signature: Chris

Female Wolf Spider with Egg Sac

Female Wolf Spider with Egg Sac

Hi Chris,
Female Wolf Spiders, like your individual, drag their egg sac behind them to protect it, and once the spiders hatch, the young spiderlings ride about on the body of the female spider for a few days before dispersing.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination