From the monthly archives: "June 2015"

Ed. Note:  Because our previous posting of Elm Seed Bugs has received so many recent comments, we have decided to make the Elm Seed Bug our Bug of the Month for July 2015 and to post it live a few days early.

Subject: Invaders!
Location: Salt Lake City Utah
June 27, 2015 12:13 pm
We have these little buggers that we seem to keep finding on the back end of our home near the windows. I found a nest of them underneath one of the blinds in our bedroom window. They dont appear to fly. They are about 1/4 inch long. What are they? Do they bite? How can we get rid of them? Thanks in advance…
Signature: -Loyal WTB fan for 5+ years

Elm Seed Bug

Elm Seed Bug

Dear Loyal WTB fan for 5+ years,
It appears that you have an Elm Seed Bug,
Arocatus melanocephalus, infestation, a nonnative species first reported in North America in Idaho in 2012.  As you must know, we do not provide extermination information, though we are sometimes freer when the species is invasive like the Elm Seed Bug.  There are currently numerous comments from readers on the first Elm Seed Bug posting in our archives, and you may find some help there.  According to Gemtek:  “Identification: Elm seed bugs are typically ⅓ inch long and are dark brown in color, with an abdomen that is reddish colored. Like a boxelder bug, their wings fold to form a thin X shape. Aside from color differences, elm seed and boxelder bugs look nearly identical.  Diet, Habitat, Life Cycle, and Habits:  Once again, elm seed bugs are similar to boxelder bugs in all of these aspects. A key difference is that elm seed bugs are primarily found on elm trees. They feed on elm seeds, but will also feed on and live in other types of trees. They are most visible in warmer weather and will create an unpleasant odor if crushed.”  According to BugGuide:  “Invade homes during the summer to escape heat, and then stick around through the winter … One generation per year and adults overwinter. Doesn’t pose a threat to trees, but may show up indoors in huge swarms.”

Elm Seed Bugs invade home.

Elm Seed Bugs invade home.

Subject: Suspicious bug
Location: Kentucky
June 28, 2015 10:41 am
I was walking and saw this bug. It sprayed some kind of liquid and it got on my hand and it left a cool feeling to my hand. Should I be concerned?
Signature: Thank you much

Mole Cricket

Mole Cricket

This is a Mole Cricket and it is harmless, so you have no cause for concern.

Subject: Beetle?
Location: Pennsylvania
June 28, 2015 1:53 pm
I spotted this what appears to be a form of beetle. I tried looking up the insect, but nothing resembles it’s color pattern. Can you help identify this bug, Thank You.
Signature: Bob

Red Legged Buprestid

Red Legged Buprestid

Dear Bob,
You encountered one of the Metallic Borer Beetles or Jewel Beetles in the family Buprestidae, the Red Legged Buprestis,
Buprestis rufipes.  The larvae are the stage that bores in wood, and according to BugGuide, the food plants include:  “Acer – Maple, Fagus – Beech, Nyssa sylvatica – Blackgum, Quercus – Oak, Ulmus – Elm.”

Subject: Large Blue
Location: Collard Hill, UK
June 26, 2015 12:26 pm
Hi bugman
I thought you might like this picture for your site. It is a Large Blue, Phengaris arion, that i photographed on 20th June at Collard Hill here in the UK. Large Blues have a really weird lifecycle, with the caterpillar spending most of its life in an ants nest feeding on ant grubs. Large Blues became extinct in the UK in 1979, but they have been reintroduced and have spread to over 20 sirtes in south west England.
Signature: Zoovolunteer

Large Blue

Large Blue

Dear Zoovolunteer,
Thanks so much for sending your images of a Large Blue, but especially for providing the information on the reintroduction of the Large Blue to the UK after their extinction there.  We would love to know the circumstances surrounding their extinction as well as where the introduced individuals originated.
  According to the IUCN Red List site, the range is:  “From notthern [sic] Spain and eastwards to Italy, Greece and southern Scandinavia. Extinct in the United Kingdom due to the loss of the short turf habitat when rabbits died out during the myxamotosis crisis. Recently successfully reintroduced to a dozen or so sites in southwestern England.”  A different IUCN Red List page provides this information:  “This species occurs in Central Europe from north and central Spain via France to Denmark, south of Sweden and south of Finland and from the south of Italy and Greece to Siberia, Mongolia, China and Japan. Re-introduced successfully into a number of areas in southern England. 0-2,000 m. The global distribution area of the species is situated both within and outside Europe.”

Large Blue

Large Blue

Subject: What kind of moth?
Location: Long Island, New York
June 24, 2015 12:03 pm
Hi! Do you know what this is?
Signature: Andrew

Blinded Sphinx

Blinded Sphinx

Dear Andrew,
This beautiful Sphinx Moth,
Paonias excaecata, is known as a Blinded Sphinx because the oculi or eyespots on the underwings appear that they do not have pupils.   See BugGuide for additional information on the Blinded Sphinx.

Subject: Beautiful Bug On Wind Chimes
Location: Danville, Kentucky
June 26, 2015 6:12 am
Please help us identify this beauty we found on our wind chimes in Danville, KY (USA) on June 25, 2015. Thank you.
Signature: Natalie

Ailanthus Webworm

Ailanthus Webworm

Dear Natalie,
This lovely moth with its intricately patterned wings is an Ailanthus Webworm.