From the monthly archives: "June 2015"

Subject: Wasp bumblebee hybrid
Location: Louisiana
June 28, 2015 7:39 pm
I saw a half wasp half bumblebee bodied flying insect today. What is this thing called and what is its potency when stinging.
Signature: Glf1sse

Cicada Killer

Cicada Killer

Dear Glf1sse,
Though your image is very blurry, we are quite certain that this is a Cicada Killer, a large wasp that preys on Cicadas.  This is our first posting of a Cicada Killer this year, though we still have two weeks of identification requests to attempt to answer, and there may be an image of a Cicada Killer there.
  We have no confirmed reports of anyone being stung by a Cicada Killer, a non-aggressive species.

Subject: Unknown beetle
Location: Baker Lake, WA
June 28, 2015 5:28 pm
Hello- I found this beetle on dung on the Baker Lake Trail that runs along the eastern edge of Baker Lake in Washington State. Is this a burying beetle?
Signature: AJ Knue

Sexton Beetle

Sexton Beetle

Dear AJ,
You are correct that this is a Burying Beetle or Sexton Beetle in the genus
Nicrophorus, and we believe based on both its appearance and range, that this Nicrophorus defodiens that is pictured on BugGuide is a likely species identification.

Subject: Glow worm in Colorado
Location: 38’48’28.8 – 104’53’57.3
June 28, 2015 11:06 pm
The night of June 27 , 2015 22:15 I was returning from a very long hike in the front range of Colorado Springs. As I walked up the the HighiDrive road I noticed what looked like the reflection of the moon light off of a crystal in the granite of a large rock. As I moved the light didn’t go away. Upon closer inspection it was very green in color. I knew it must be chemoluminesance. I grew up in these mountains for over 40 years. I have never seen this here before. It was at 7520ft and there were several of them along 1/2 mile portion of the road. The one in the photo was much brighter then the other ones I saw. The question is what is the life cycle of this insect and what are the limiting factors keeping there numbers down? Photo attached. Thank you.
Signature: Bob Zook

Glowworm

Glowworm

Dear Bob,
Though they are commonly called Pink Glowworms, this member of the genus
Microphotus is actually a Firefly in the family Lampyridae, and not a true Glowworm in the family Phengodidae.  There is not much information on BugGuide.  In a 2005 posting on our site, we learned through Eric Eaton who contacted an expert that:  “He notes that they were all females collected in June and July and that, although their identities are not certain, they are probably pecosensis. “  Based on information we have learned through the years, we suspect this is an adult, larviform female.  We have been receiving numerous recent comments to our Pink Glowworm posts regarding new sightings.

Glow of a Glowworm

Glow of a Glowworm

Subject: Nunavut bug
Location: Rankin Inlet, Nunavut, Canada
June 28, 2015 8:21 pm
Hi, this is a picture a friend took of a bug in Nunavut, far north of Canada. I’m not sure anyone can identify it, as it seems to be sparkling with wetness of some kind.
Signature: Margaret B.

Marsh Ground Beetle

Marsh Ground Beetle

Dear Margaret,
Initially we thought this might be a Tiger Beetle, and we knew it looked familiar, and we had a vague memory from long ago of receiving an image of a similar looking beetle
, and though it was related to the Tiger Beetles, it was actually classified differently.  Well, we eventually found this image of a Marsh Ground Beetle in the genus Elaphrus in our archives, and we believe your individual looks very similar.  This image of Elaphrus americanus from BugGuide looks very similar.  According to BugGuide, it is found:  “From the arctic treeline south to central British Columbia and east to Newfoundland. Along the pacific coast from British Columbia to southern Oregon, eastward across southern British Columbia to southwestern Alberta, south to northeastern Oregon, central Idaho and central Colorado.”

Subject: werid bug
Location: sc
June 26, 2015 11:58 pm
came home at night, and the end of june. the bug was sitting off away from the light, almost in the shadows, has 4 wings, eyes on the side of the head, almost ant like pinchers, to very long feelers coming off the top above and towards the front of head. I do have a couple of more pics if need be
Signature: doesn’t matter

Female Dobsonfly

Female Dobsonfly

Though she is basically harmless, you might want to stay clear of the mandibles on this female Dobsonfly as she might deliver a painful pinch.

Subject: Butterfly
Location: Cascades Mountains
June 27, 2015 10:51 am
Hi, I found several black-and-white butterflies flying around some damp soil at the 4200-ft. elevation of Mt. Rainier in Washington state on June 26. I photographed one of them; not a great shot, but I hope it shows the essentials. Can you tell me what it is? Thanks.
Signature: gardenjim

Diurnal Geometrid Moth

Diurnal Geometrid Moth

Dear gardenjim,
This is not a butterfly, but a diurnal Geometrid Moth in the genus
RheumapteraBased on this BugGuide image, we believe it may be Rheumaptera subhastata, but it may be a different species, because according to BugGuide:  “The variation in pattern among individuals of R. hastata and R. subhastata is much greater than the variation between the two species. … Since these two species have virtually identical geographic ranges, examination of genitalia is the only reliable way to separate the two.”