Subject: Glow worm in Colorado
Location: 38’48’28.8 – 104’53’57.3
June 28, 2015 11:06 pm
The night of June 27 , 2015 22:15 I was returning from a very long hike in the front range of Colorado Springs. As I walked up the the HighiDrive road I noticed what looked like the reflection of the moon light off of a crystal in the granite of a large rock. As I moved the light didn’t go away. Upon closer inspection it was very green in color. I knew it must be chemoluminesance. I grew up in these mountains for over 40 years. I have never seen this here before. It was at 7520ft and there were several of them along 1/2 mile portion of the road. The one in the photo was much brighter then the other ones I saw. The question is what is the life cycle of this insect and what are the limiting factors keeping there numbers down? Photo attached. Thank you.
Signature: Bob Zook

Glowworm

Glowworm

Dear Bob,
Though they are commonly called Pink Glowworms, this member of the genus
Microphotus is actually a Firefly in the family Lampyridae, and not a true Glowworm in the family Phengodidae.  There is not much information on BugGuide.  In a 2005 posting on our site, we learned through Eric Eaton who contacted an expert that:  “He notes that they were all females collected in June and July and that, although their identities are not certain, they are probably pecosensis. “  Based on information we have learned through the years, we suspect this is an adult, larviform female.  We have been receiving numerous recent comments to our Pink Glowworm posts regarding new sightings.

Glow of a Glowworm

Glow of a Glowworm

Location: Colorado Springs, Colorado

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