From the monthly archives: "May 2015"

Subject: Eyed Elater
Location: Edwin Warner park, Nashville, TN
May 27, 2015 8:50 am
I almost stepped on this one at the park and it scared the crap out of me! I identified it using your site and have a good picture of it. It’s contrast stands out a little better than some of the darker ones.
Signature: n/a

Eyed Elater

Eyed Elater

Thanks for sending us your image of an Eyed Elater.  We are posting it.

Subject: Some type of bug
Location: San Francisco
May 27, 2015 1:53 pm
There’s a large amount of these bugs grouped together on a wild plant on the side of a construction site. I thought maybe a stink or squash bug but can’t find a picture of one that looks exactly like these.
Signature: Vonny

Squash Bug Nymphs

Squash Bug Nymphs

Dear Vonny,
We don’t know where you located images of Squash Bugs, but these look like immature Squash Bugs in the genus
Anasa based on this image posted to BugGuide.  Though BugGuide does not report any California sightings of Anasa tristis, the genus is represented in California.  The plant that they are feeding upon looks like a member of the squash family Cucurbitaceae to us.

Squash Bug Nymphs

Squash Bug Nymphs

Subject: black-spotted beetle
Location: Olympic Mountains, WA
May 27, 2015 12:52 pm
Hi, This beautiful beetle flew into the picture as I was photographing the Washington State flower, Rhododendron macrophyllum, in the Olympic Mountains at an elevation of about 3500 feet. I took the picture May26, 2015. Any idea what it is?
Signature: gardenjim

Flower Longhorn

Flower Longhorn

Dear gardenjim,
We have identified your Flower Longhorn as
Evodinus monticola vancouveri, a species with no common name, by matching it to an image posted to BugGuide.  It really is a stunning beetle.

Subject: Himalayan Atlas Moth?
Location: Bhutan, eastern Himalaya
May 27, 2015 9:10 pm
A former student of mine from Bhutan sent me a photo of what I believe is an Attacus atlas that he collected in the forest near Samtse, Bhutan. Could you confirm the species for me?
Many thanks.
-Benjamin Sinclair
Biologist/Naturalist
Jackson Hole, WY
Signature: Benjamin Sinclair, Naturalist

Atlas Moth

Edward’s Atlas Moth

Dear Benjamin,
We believe this is
Archaeoattacus edwardsii, Edward’s Atlas Moth, based on images posted to Silkmoths Bizland, where it states:  “Ailanthus and Kashi holly are favorite natural hosts”.  Some enterprising entrepreneur can start a new business raising Edward’s Atlas Moths for butterfly habitats, feeding the caterpillars on the invasive, exotic Trees of Heaven that are found throughout North America where they are crowding out native trees and plants.

Subject: Identify Grasshopper
Location: Mpumalanga Pelgrimsrest area
May 27, 2015 4:16 am
Good day,
There are quite a few of this beautiful black & red with a touch of blue grasshoppers in the Drakensberg area between Pelgrimsrest and Orhrigstad in the Mpumalanga district. I have looked through various books & tried to identify this grasshopper but had no success. It seems as though they do not have developed wings .
Signature: Naomi Le Roux

Milkweed Grasshopper

Koppie Foam Grasshopper

Dear Naomi,
Your Grasshopper is a Koppie Foam Grasshopper,
Dictyophorus spumans, which you can view on iSpot.  According to iNaturalist:  “the koppie foam grasshopper or rooibaadjie, is a species of grasshopper in the family Pyrgomorphidae indigenous to Africa. The name “foaming grasshopper” derives from the insect’s ability to produce a toxic foam from its thoracic glands.”

Subject: They are everywhere
Location: Northeast. State of CT
May 26, 2015 5:00 pm
It is almost summer time in CT. Temps are climbing to mid 80’s. We can’t even go outside now. They are on us when we go in the grass. They are on the deck. It’s crazy. We have never had these before. Been living here for 4 years.
They don’t bite. Im just so concerned for the children and tracking inside the house.
Signature: Concerned CT resident

Globular Springtails

Globular Springtails

Dear Concerned CT resident,
You have no cause for concern.  These look like Globular Springtails in the order Symphpleona, and you may compare your image to those on BugGuide. Springtails are perfectly harmless, though they can be an annoyance when they are plentiful.