What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Please identify
Location: Nelspruit, South Africa
May 19, 2015 3:11 am
I found this butterfly this morning but have not been able to identify it yet
Signature: Nicolette

Milkweed Butterfly

Snouted Tiger Moth

Dear Nicolette,
We believe this is a Milkweed Butterfly in the subfamily Danaiae, but we wish your image had more detail because it does not appear that your individual has clubbed antennae.  Your individual appears to be dead, so it is possible the ends of the antennae have been damaged.  We browsed unsuccessfully through iSpot, and though we did not locate any exact matches, we did observe a similarity to butterflies in the genus
Amauris, and the closest match we could find is Amauris ochlea, the Novice, which is pictured on BioDiversity Explorer.  We are not fully confident that is a correct identification, and we are still troubled by the lack of a clubbed end on the antennae on your image.  Perhaps one of our readers will steer us in another direction.

Correction:  Snouted Tiger Moth
South African entomology student Michelle sent us a comment identifying this as a moth in the subfamily Arctiinae, in the genus Nyctemera.  Following that lead, we found this image of a Snouted Tiger Moth, Nyctemera leuconoe, on iSpot.  We suspect there is some mimicry involved here as Milkweed Butterflies are distasteful, and the Snouted Tiger Moth probably derives some protections from resembling one.  The same species is called a White Bear on iNaturalist.

Dear Daniel,
Found an id at last- its a white bear moth – Family: arctiidae
Thank you for taking the time to help me in my search to id!
Regards
Nicolette

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination
Location: Nelspruit, South Africa
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2 Responses to Diurnal Snouted Tiger Moth, NOT Milkweed Butterfly from South Africa

  1. Michelle Janssen says:

    Good evening, I’m an entomology student at the university of pretoria and I have identified this as a moth. Its from the Family : Arctiidae and is a species within the Nyctemera genus.

    • bugman says:

      That explains our confusion regarding the antennae. Thanks so much for the correction. We will update the posting and search for some online links.

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