What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: WTB????
Location: Golfito, Costa Rica
May 10, 2015 5:02 PM
Thank you WTB. I had sent another request for identification months ago. I never received a response. I realize you receive many requests, therefore, I thank you for this one.
Daniel,
Here are the pics of this guy. You can’t really see, but the end of the wings (I think) came out like a trunk. Also, found in Golfito, Costa Rica. We get a lot of interesting critters here.
Thanks so much.
Signature: Golfito

Sphinx Moth

Carpenter Moth

Dear Golfito,
This looks like a Sphinx Moth in the family Sphingidae.  We do not recognize it and we will attempt an identification.
  We browsed through the individuals pictured on the Costa Rica page of the Sphingidae of the Americas, and though we could not locate a conclusive visual match, we believe this is a member of the tribe Dilophonotini.  We will contact Bill Oehlke to see if he can provide an identification.

Bill Oehlke provides a correction
Hi Daniel,
It is not one of the Sphingidae. Don’t know which family it is in.
Bill

Update:  Carpenter Moth
Both Lepidopterist Julian Donahue and Insetologia webmaster Cesar Crash informed us that this is a Carpenter Moth,
Langsdorfia franckii.

Now, how cool is that? Thank you Daniel, WTB and Bill Oehlke!
Isn’t he a handsome looking moth? I just the great bugs we have here. ☺
Sincerely,
Janny

Update:  December 17, 2015
Daniel,
I am so impressed with your desire to help a total bug novice .. how wonderful to be able to seek out the experts.
Thank you so much for the WTB identification. I will forward to all my bug loving friends.
Oh, do you think the photo is cool? I find it so interesting.

Sincerely,
Janny

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination
Location: Golfito, Costa Rica

5 Responses to Carpenter Moth, NOT Sphinx Moth from Costa Rica

  1. Julian P Donahue says:

    This is a carpenter moth (family Cossidae, subfamily Hypoptinae) in the genus Langsdorfia. The genus currently contains some 23 species, but L. franckii is one of the more common ones in Central America.

  2. It’s a Langsdorfia cf. franckii (Cossidae).

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