From the monthly archives: "April 2015"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s this flying beastie?
Location: tuscany
April 26, 2015 8:42 am
Took this photo in N. Italy last year. Cannot find what species it is. Can you identify I please?
Signature: Eric

Owlfly

Owlfly

Dear Eric,
The first time we received an image of this particular European Owlfly,
Ascalaphus libelluloides, we did not know how to classify it as it has characteristics associated with several different insect orders.  Owlflies are related to Lacewings and Antlions, and they are classified in the order Neuroptera. 

Great…your are a star…it’s been bugging me (sorry) for a while.
Thanks

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: tan bettle with yellow edges
Location: Griffith Park, Los Angeles, California
April 25, 2015 11:18 pm
We spotted this beetle in Griffith Park, California. Can you tell us what it is?
Signature: Catherine Rhodes

Bordered Plant Bug

Bordered Plant Bug

Dear Catherine,
You have submitted an image of a Bordered Plant Bug,
Largus californicus, a true bug, not a beetle.  According to BugGuide, they feed on:  “Mostly plants (flowers, leaves, fruit) from a range of families, with a preference for Lupines. L. californicus is not considered a “pest species” of economic importance.”

Dear Daniel,
Thank you so much for identifying this little guy.  That is so interesting.  I shared with my fellow bug hiking mates too.  Terrific that you do this!  Catherine

You are most welcome.  Though we have an international following, we are a local resource for you in Los Angeles.  We can see the Griffith Observatory from our offices in quaint Mount Washington in the hills of Northeast Los Angeles.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What Are These?!
Location: Southern California
April 25, 2015 3:52 am
I work at a convenience store, and OVER NIGHT something laid seseme seed-like eggs in all if our employee cups!!
Ive searched the internet looking for answers, but found nothing! Is it dangerous, poisonous? Help us!
Signature: InconvenientEmployee

What's In The Cup???

What’s In The Cup???

Dear Inconvenient Employee,
We are flummoxed by your request.  This is so strange we don’t know where to start.  Were these things found anywhere but inside the cups?  Their rapid appearance and the specificity of their location seems to suggest a disgruntled employee, or perhaps there is a prankster in your midst. 

What Left This???

What Left This???

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Classification
Location: East Central Texas
April 24, 2015 11:57 pm
I need help identifying this organism. This image is under 40x magnification under a microscope. It was pulled from a pond in East Central Texas, and appeared to be sucking water through its anus as a way over breathing in the water.
Signature: Kendrick

Hatchling Dragonfly Naiad

Hatchling Dragonfly Naiad

Dear Kendrick,
This appears to be a very young, perhaps recently hatched, Dragonfly Naiad.  There are many types of flying insects like Dragonflies, Damselflies, Stoneflies and Mayflies that have aquatic nymphs that are known as Naiads.  The water action that you observed is nicely explained by Charles Hogue in his excellent book Insects of the Los Angeles Basin:  “Human beings are latecomers in the use of jet propulsion.  by porcibly expelling water from its rectum, the dragonfly nymph can drive its body forward through the water at great speed.  This is an emergency method of locomotion that is employed principally to evade enemies.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Moth ?
Location: Clisson, France
April 23, 2015 9:18 am
I spotted this beauty last summer, during Hellfest Open Air Festival (06 / 20-21-22 / 2014) in Clisson, France.
It landed on our tente on the first day, and almost not move for 3 days, despite the sun and the rain.
When we folded the tente, it flew away and landed on the top of a tree.
It was about 5-6 cm long, without antennae, it had hairy and soft paws.
I live in Nantes, near Clisson, and I’ve never seen that kind of bug before.
Does anyone ever seen the same beauty ? What is its species ?
Thank you so much for your help.
Signature: Fleur

Tiger Moth we believe

Lesser Puss Moth

Dear Fleur,
WE believe that this is a Tiger Moth in the subfamily Arctiinae, but we cannot be certain.  We have attempted to search the UK Moths site because we don’t know of a French resource, and we have not had any luck with the identification.

Update:  April 25, 2015
Thanks to a comment from Cesar Crash of Insetologia, we now know that this is Cerura ermine, a Prominent Moth in the family Notodontidae, and that it is called a Lesser Puss Moth according to the Lepidoptera Breeders Association.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: bees
Location: Saudi Arabia- Madinah
April 21, 2015 8:27 am
Hi!
I’ve found a strange bee, it’s smaller than Common bees.
Signature: M.A

Solitary Bee

Solitary Bee

Dear M.A,
This is some species of Solitary Bee, and we will continue to search in the hope of providing something more specific.  We didn’t see anything that looked like a good match for the distinctive abdominal markings on your individual when we searched Gordon’s Solitary Bee Page.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination