From the monthly archives: "April 2015"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Lepidoptera Madagascar
Location: Masoala, Madagascar
April 30, 2015 8:11 am
Dear Bugman,
Besides the ladybug from last week I found a lot of other interesting creatures. Another one is this Lepidoptera, also from the jungle of Masoala, Madagascar.
Do you have any ideas? I was thinking in the direction of the Arctiinae (erebid moths) ?
Thanks!
Signature: Dennis

Moth: a Riot of Color

Moth: a Riot of Color

Wow Dennis,
Your image is a riot of primary, saturated color.  Our first impression is also Arctiinae, and more specifically the Lichen Moths in the tribe Lithosiini, and you can view numerous North American species on BugGuide.
  Our initial search turned up nothing, and we really need to get some sleep after a long, hard day.

Update:  We still haven’t located a species identification for this spectacular moth, and we are enlisting the assistance of our readership.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Wolf Spider
Location: Ohio, United States
April 30, 2015 1:16 am
I came across this beauty today that I believe to be an H. lenta. She was carrying an egg sack with her. I’m very curious to see the spiderlings and the mother’s care, so I set up a large escape proof terrarium to watch her in for a bit. Confirmation on her species would be well appreciated.
Signature: SillyToadGirl (Lexi)

Wolf Spider with Egg Sac

Wolf Spider with Egg Sac

Hi Lexi,
The manner with which the female Wolf Spider transports her egg sac is quite characteristic, dragging it about from her spinnerets, so your family identification is definitely correct.  According to BugGuide,
Hogna lenta is found in Ohio, so the species is a possibility, but we cannot be certain.  Perhaps one of our readers can confirm the species identity for you.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Help with ugly spider id
Location: Modesto, California
April 28, 2015 3:14 pm
I was wondering if you could help us identify the spider we found outside our door today?
Signature: Michelle

Grass Spider

Grass Spider

Hi Michelle,
We believe, because of the large, prominent spinnerets at the tip of the abdomen, that your individual is a Funnel Web Spider in the family Agelenidae, and a Grass Spider in the genus
Agelenopsis, and you can compare your individual to this image from BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “They also have two prominent hind spinnerets. A spinneret is a spider’s silk spinning organ. They are usually on the underside of a spider’s abdomen, to the rear. On many spiders, the spinnerets cannot be seen easily without flipping the spider over; however, with Agelenopsis, the spinnerets are readily seen without having to flip the spider over. Agelenopsis spp. also have somewhat indistinct bands on their legs.” 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this weird bug
Location: Saudi Arabia
April 29, 2015 8:55 pm
I found this guy being attacked by ants and I wondered what in the world is this !? It has big eyes,wings,grasshopper like legs , claw like hands !? Help
Signature: normal

Mole Cricket

Mole Cricket

Dear normal,
Because of their large size and unusual appearance, Mole Crickets generally create an impression on folks who see them for the first time, and we do get reports of Mole Crickets from around the globe.  Mole Crickets are subterranean, and though they are quite common, they are only encountered when they come to the surface.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Inchworm Mayhem
Location: Mumbai, India
April 29, 2015 7:34 am
Dear Bugman,
These inchworms have wreaked havoc in my tiny balcony garden, fairly shredding my spider-plants to bits. Could you help id? I understand from your site that inchworms are geometrid moths caterpillars. It’s full summer now in India, and the photos are today’s (April 29). Another couple of days and it would’ve been ‘May’hem quite literally and figuratively 😀
Regards,
Signature: Ankush

Inchworms

Inchworms

Dear Ankush,
Is your Spider Plant a Chlorophytum species like that posted on Wikipedia?  Knowing the food plant is often a big help with identifying caterpillars and other plant feeding insects.  We attempted a search with the genus name of the Spider Plant and the family name Geometridae, but to no avail.  You image is stunning and clearly shows the looping action the Inchworm uses to move about, a result of having fewer sets of prolegs than the typical caterpillar.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: moth
Location: suffolk u.k
April 29, 2015 11:19 am
Hi there
last summer i noticed on the fly screen of the door the biggest mother of a moth i had ever seen. i quickly got my camera and took some photo’s of it. it was really quite beautiful but i have no clue what sort of moth it is. in live in suffolk in the U.K
any feedback gratefully received
Signature: juliet x

Poplar Hawkmoth

Poplar Hawkmoth

Dear Juliet,
This wondrous creature is a Poplar Hawkmoth,
Laothoe populi, and according to UK Moths, it is:  “Probably the commonest of our hawk-moths, it has a strange attitude when at rest, with the hindwings held forward of the forewings, and the abdomen curved upwards at the rear. If disturbed it can flash the hindwings, which have a contrasting rufous patch, normally hidden.”

Poplar Hawkmoth

Poplar Hawkmoth

Thanks so much for that information. very much appreciated.
it was so lovely.
regards
juliet bumstead

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination