From the monthly archives: "February 2015"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Butterfly
Location: Western NY
February 22, 2015 10:03 am
I have gone dizzy skimming through photos on web sites to identify this butterfly. The picture was taken in late June. The orange on which it sits was hung out to attract Orioles. This was in western New York south of Rochester.
Signature: Denny Showers

White Admiral

White Admiral

Dear Denny,
This beautiful butterfly is a White Admiral,
Limenitis arthemis arthemis, a northeastern color variation of a complex that also includes the Red Spotted Purple and the Western White Admiral.  They will interbreed, so regions where the ranges overlap often have individuals that contain characteristics of two distinct regional forms of the species.  See BugGuide for a more thorough description of the complex.  We understand you are having a rough winter this year, and cheerful images like yours should remind our readers in the northeast that spring is not far off.

Thank you so much. I don’t know why it didn’t show up in the web sites I skimmed through of New York insects.
It gives me hope for spring.
Thanks again.
–DS

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Beautiful beetle
Location: California
February 21, 2015 3:04 pm
Hello again! I found this lovely iridescent beetle this morning, sitting on a leaf near one of our tiny seasonal creeks. It looks something like Chrysochus auratus, but the references I see for that species say it is found in Northeastern US, and I am in the Sierra Foothills of California (oak savannah terrain). Can you help me identify this one?
Signature: Megan Ralph

Possibly Leaf Beetle

Possibly Leaf Beetle

Dear Megan,
This is not a Dogbane Leaf Beetle, but we believe your metallic beetle is also a member of the Leaf Beetle family Chrysomelidae.  At this time, our research has not produced a visual match.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Southern House Spider
Location: Richmond, VA
February 20, 2015 12:59 am
Some time ago, I think last winter (maybe the one before), I wrote to you about a southern house spider I caught behind my couch and was going to release in the spring — you suggested I keep her, as I have tarantula experience, and I did. She’s fat and happy to this day, and she’s grown some.
This winter, I have another friend. She lives above my bed, behind an animal-skin wall hanging. I saw the web and meant to brush it away, off of my stuff (it makes all of the fur stick together and look bad), but then I saw her and realized the space was occupied. For now, and very probably permanently, she can stay, as it’s somewhere she’s safe from us accidentally hurting her, and from us being bitten on accident. I’m probably going to start feeding her periodically, so she will be more likely to stay put, instead of setting up camp somewhere less safe. I noticed her weeks ago, but I don’t see her very often. She very likely could have been living there for months. In this picture, she is out on her web “patio”, hanging out. I notice she does this at night sometimes, but usually she’s hidden all day. It’s interesting how her web is — it looks like a snowflake against the wall, and seems to exist mostly so that she can sit there with out losing footing and falling.
I’ve seen some males in my house. I think there’s a big “family” living with me.
Here’s some good pictures, if you want to put them on your website.
Best regards,
Denise Elliott

Southern House Spider

Southern House Spider

Dear Denise,
Thanks for updating us on the Southern House Spiders with which you are sharing your home .

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unknown Insect
Location: South Africa, Cape Town
February 20, 2015 1:13 am
Found this interesting insect in my moms garden in Cape Town, Western Cape, South Africa.
It looks similar to a grasshopper but have no idea what it is. Have never seen this before. Hope you can help identify it.
Signature: JC Hanekom

Cape Longhorn

Cape Longhorn

Dear JC Hanekom,
This looks to us like a Cape Longhorn,
Ceroplesis capensis, which is pictured on iSpot, but for some reason, your individual is missing its distinctive long antennae.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: University Assignment
Location: Vereeniging, South Africa
February 21, 2015 6:19 am
Hi bugman!
I’m currently doing an assignment which requires me to find and identify insects that I come across and I recently found this beetle type thing. I’ve tried searching for the characteristics online but I haven’t found a picture that matches mine. It looks to be some type of beetle but it doesn’t seem to have any wings. It’s about 2 – 2.5cm long and about 1cm wide at its widest point. I live in South Africa, and it is currently the last month of Summer here. Please help!
Signature: Jess

Beetle

Lily Weevil

Dear Jess,
We agree that this is a Beetle, and many species of beetles, including some members of the Blister Beetle family and the Darkling Beetle family, have fused elytra that prohibit the beetles from flying.  We do not recognize this unusual beetle, and we plan to do additional research, but we have some errands to run this morning and we will return to this search.  Right now, we can say that your beetle reminds us of Desert Spider Beetles in the family Meloidae, but we searched through six pages on iSpot without finding a match.  Additionally, the antennae and legs are quite different.  Meanwhile, can you please provide us with more information on the sighting.  Where was it found?  In the home?  In the desert? On a plant?  Just as we were about to post, we decided to see if it might be a Weevil, and we believe this is a Weevil in the genus
 Brachycerus based on this image and others posted to iSpot.  We are going to go with Lily Weevil, Brachycerus labrusca, and there are several images on iSpot.

Beetle

Lily Weevil

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug Identification
Location: Medowie, Australia NSW
February 17, 2015 1:28 pm
I was hoping to have this bug identified. It is in a tree in our yard in Medowie NSW. No-one seems to know what it is. There is a circular spider web right next to the bug & cocoon of eggs.
Signature: Toni Alley

Tussock Moth with Eggs

Tussock Moth with Eggs

Dear Toni,
This is a flightless female Tussock Moth with her eggs, probably
Orgyia australis.

Thank you for letting me know 🙂
Toni Alley

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination