From the monthly archives: "February 2015"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: tropical fly
Location: Highlands, Papua New Guinea
January 31, 2015 12:16 am
Found this in our village where we work as missionaries. Never seen anything like it and am wondering what kind it is. (See attached pic)
Signature: David Ogg

Tachinid Fly

Tachinid Fly

Dear David,
This is a beautiful and colorful Fly, and we are relatively certain it is a Tachinid Fly in the family Tachinidae.  Tachinid Flies are parasitoids.  The female lays an egg on a very host specific prey, and the larval Tachinid Fly feeds on the internal organs eventually killing the host, at which time it will form a puparium and eventually emerge as an adult Tachinid Fly.  According to BugGuide:  “Larval stages are parasitoids of other arthropods; hosts include members of 11 insect orders, centipedes, spiders, and scorpions. Some tachinids are very host-specific, others parasitize a wide variety of hosts. The most common hosts are caterpillars. Most tachinids deposit their eggs directly on the body of their host, and it is not uncommon to see caterpillars with several tachinid eggs on them. Upon hatching the larva usually burrows into its host and feeds internally. Full-grown larva leaves the host and pupates nearby. Some tachinids lay their eggs on foliage; the larvae are flattened and are called planidia; they remain on the foliage until they find a suitable host.”  We are attempting to provide you with a species identification for this distinctive, probable Tachinid Fly.  The Tachinid Collection pictured on Tachinidae Resources includes
Rutilia (Donovanius) regalis, which looks similar to your individual, but we are not even certain of that species’ range.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Spider ID please
Location: Scottburgh, KZN, South Africa
January 30, 2015 10:25 pm
Hi there, could you please help identify this spider, found in Scottburgh, kzn, South Africa.
Many thanks
Signature: Angie

Wolf Spider

Wolf Spider

Dear Angie,
Based on the eye arrangement pictured on BugGuide, we are confident that this is a Wolf Spider in the family Lycosidae.
  There are some excellent Wolf Spider images on iSpot.  A large Wolf Spider might bite a human if it is carelessly handled, but Wolf Spiders are not considered dangerous.

Hi Daniel
Thanks so much for the ID of the little wolf spider.
Appreciate the speedy answer 🙂
Best regards
Angie

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Coleoptera in Namibia
Location: Namibia
February 1, 2015 4:11 am
This insect was in the namib desert in Namibia :
https://goo.gl/maps/2OQMc
Thanks for your research !
Signature: A traveler

Dung Beetle

Dung Beetle

Dear A traveler,
This is a Dung Beetle, and it resembles this image of
Pachysoma rodriguesi that is pictured on FlickR, but we cannot say for certain if the species is correct.  Because of the large numbers of large, grazing herd animals in Africa, there are many Dung Beetles which gather fresh dung into a ball that is rolled across the terrain until the Dung Beetle finds an appropriate place to dig a nest.  An egg is laid on the Dung Ball and the dung provides food for the developing larva.  Dung Beetles are the inspiration for the Egyptian Scarab Beetles that are often pictured with orbs signifying the sun. 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Male Flower Wasp
Location: Oldbury Western Australia
January 31, 2015
Meanwhile I have a couple of pics of an identified wasp for your collection, that I will attach to this mail if you are interested, as a thank you.  I see you have a pic of the female, but didn’t see one of the male.  This is a male flower wasp from the family Tiphiidae as identified by the Western Australian Museum.  I fished him out of my dog’s water bowl.
Best regards,
Jill

Male Flower Wasp

Male Flower Wasp

Dear Jill,
We have created a distinct posting for your male Flower Wasp images, and we are thrilled that you submitted them.  We do have one additional image of a male Flower Wasp in the family Tiphidae from Australia, and that individual is from Wollongong.  Because of your kindness fishing this harmless creature from your dog’s water bowl, we are tagging the posting with the Bug Humanitarian Award

Flower Wasp

Flower Wasp

Thanks for the most honourable award Daniel.  Of course I love nature, so am actually a great crusader for saving creatures of all description.  The warm happy feeling I get from saving a life, no matter how inconsequential to some people, is reward enough. : )
I was really impressed with my son the other day, who had a huntsman spider run across his chest.. this scared the crap out of him (and no doubt also the spider), but rather than bang her on the head, he found a mop and coaxed her on board and took her outside to live out her days.  I was very happy that I probably have influenced his kindness and understanding of nature. : )
I will stick to one bug at a time in submission in future as requested.
Thanks again for everything.  You have a wonderful website.
Best regards,
Jill

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination