What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Phasmid in Australia
Location: Emerald, Queensland, Australia
February 10, 2015 5:01 am
Hi, looking for confirmation of type. This bug was found in the central highlands of Queensland in Emerald. I’ve been told children’s on several bug forums but am thinking either Goliath or Red Shouldered. I’ve included egg pictures incase that is of some help identifying her
Signature: Crystal

Phasmid

Red Shouldered Phasmid

Dear Crystal,
We haven’t the time this morning to do any research, so we are posting your images and we hope to get some input from our readers.

Phasmid

Red Shouldered Phasmid

Phasmid Eggs

Phasmid Eggs

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination
Location: Emerald, Queensland, Australia

5 Responses to Red Shouldered Phasmid from Australia

  1. aussietrev says:

    Definitely not a Goliath, nowhere near colourful enough and Goliaths have green wings. The wing colour also rules out Children’s in my opinion since they have pale green wings with blue near the shoulder. The eggs don’t appear to match either species from what I can see in the photo. A next step might be to submit an enquiry here
    http://bie.ala.org.au/species/urn:lsid:biodiversity.org.au:afd.taxon:b94e165c-8d3c-4c21-b0ba-7bd2b033eb93 as they have no reported sightings of Red Shoulders in Queensland so it may be a related species.

  2. Matthew says:

    This is definitely a Red-Shouldered Phasmid (Tropidoderus rhodomus). This species is large and not particularly well-documented, so I don’t really have much formal evidence to give you, but here are some of the few images online that there are: https://www.flickr.com/photos/12616079@N00/3206118568/
    http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Arthur_Bartholomew_-_Red_shouldered_stick_insect,_Tropidoderus_rhodomus_-_Google_Art_Project.jpg
    This species is similar to the Children’s Stick Insect (Tropidoderus childrenii), but is larger and has the red wings that give it its name. They are found in northern Queensland, but as is the case with most Australian phasmids they are rarely seen, hence the lack of sightings recorded. Hope this helps!

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