What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Spider in Flores, Indonesia
Location: Labuanbajo, Flores, Indonesia
February 4, 2015 6:24 am
Found this spider in my house. Very fast and about 7 centimeter diameter (including legs). Do you know what it is?
Signature: Chris

Huntsman Spider

Huntsman Spider

Hi Chris,
This is a Huntsman Spider or Giant Crab Spider,
Heteropoda venatoria, and it is considered harmless to humans.  This species is also called a Banana Spider because they were often imported with bunches of banana and they have become established in warm coastal cities throughout the world because of global shipments of bananas.  Huntsman Spiders do not build a web, but they hunt their prey, often Cockroaches, at night, so they can be considered beneficial.

Wow super quick. Thanks a ton!
Thanks,
Chris

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination
Location: Flores, Indonesia

2 Responses to Huntsman Spider from Indonesia

  1. “Is not considered harmless” = significant typo

    • bugman says:

      OOPS. We were preparing a counter-statement when we realized you were correcting our language and not our intent. We maintain this Huntsman Spider is relatively harmless to humans. Thanks for catching our error. We will nonetheless post the research we conducted to support that statement. According to Texas Invasive Species Institute: “Ecological Threat: The huntsman spider is not poisonous, but if handled aggressively it will issue a painful bite. This spider does not use a web to capture prey and is ideal for management of cockroaches and similar indoor pests.” According to BugGuide: “Can be swift and sometimes aggressive but not considered dangerously venomous to humans. May bite in self-defense if roughly handled; mildly painful bite (can be likened to a bee sting if spider injects venom).” According to the University of Florida Extension site: “It is not a dangerous spider, but a locally painful bite can be delivered to any human who carelessly handles a huntsman spider.” According to the Natural History Museum site: “The venom causes mild symptoms in humans (Bucherl, 1971). “

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *