From the monthly archives: "January 2015"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug in my kitchen
Location: Cork, Ireland
January 1, 2015 5:11 pm
Hi, I was just wondering if you could tell me what this bug is? It scared the life out of me! It’s nt something that you would usually see. Hope the photos are ok because there’s not a hope I’m taking the glass off for a closer look!
Signature: H France

Cockchafer

Cockchafer

Dear H France,
This Scarab Beetle is commonly called a Cockchafer,
Melolontha melolontha, and they are found throughout Europe.  This January sighting is very unusual.  According to the Natural History Museum site, Cockchafers are generally sighted:  “flying on warm evenings from May to July. Melolontha melolontha is attracted to artificial light and often comes indoors through open windows or even down chimneys. May bugs may cause consternation to those who encounter them but are harmless to humans.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: White bug in room?
Location: Wooden bedside table in room
January 2, 2015 7:05 am
Hello, I recently have been seeing these small, long white bugs all over my bed side table, I have a fish tank on it that they hide under, there are big and small ones all over it only at night, can you tell me what they are?
Signature: From Erin

Springtail

Springtail

Dear Erin,
The location field on our submission form should be used to specify the country, state or city where the sighting occurred as that is often a tremendous assistance in identifications.  This appears to be a Springtail, a primitive hexapod in the class Collembola, and they are frequently found in damp dark locations where they feed on fungus, mold and similar growths.  Water splashed from your aquarium is probably contributing to a habitable environment for the Springtails.  Though they can be a nuisance when they are plentiful, Springtails are considered to be benign or beneficial depending upon where they are found.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Strange caterpillar I cannot identify
Location: I couldn’t find the location as this was last summer but it was about 5 Km outside of Boyle, Alberta.
January 1, 2015 12:27 pm
Dear, Mr.Bugman,
I found this caterpillar in the boreal forest of Alberta, Canada. Unfortunately I learned the hard way that it does in fact sting. It’s body is mostly orange but has a stripe of white near it’s belly. When it turns left or white you can see that it is banded with black and also what three black tufts of hair. Two near it’s head and one near its rear. On both sides of it’s body it has very fine tufts of white hairs.
Signature: Sincerely, Kyle Howard

Alder Dagger Moth Caterpillar

Fingered Dagger Moth Caterpillar

Dear Kyle,
We quickly located a matching image of your caterpillar on North Coast Diaries where it is identified as Acronicta hesperida with the indication that it is “not so common on the ground, but easy to find on the branches of alder trees.
”  While we did not find that species on BugGuide, your image matches the images of the Fingered Dagger Moth or Alder Dagger Moth Caterpillars that are posted on BugGuide where it states:   “western populations formerly considered a separate species (Acronicta hesperida) are now considered synonymous with A. dactylina.”  BugGuide also notes:  “uncommon, but widely distributed.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bolsa spidea eggs?
Location: Anaheim, CA
January 1, 2015 4:36 pm
Howdy, these were found in a heap between avocado leaves. Can you ID? They’re about 1cm diameter, about 10 of them, tangled in sticky web, hard shell.
Signature: Becky G

Bolas Spider Egg Sacs

Bolas Spider Egg Sacs

Happy New Year Becky G,
We agree with you that these are Bolas Spider Egg Sacs, not those of a Bolsa Spidea.  Bolas Spiders are very well camouflaged and are difficult to find.  The egg sacs we reported on in November appear to have been parasitized, but we have hopes that a few individuals will hatch to perpetuate the species in our garden.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Ant like bug
Location: South Africa. Limpopo
December 30, 2014 3:27 pm
It is a very big bug.Is it poisonous?I took the photo myself.It was at around 11 pm and it is summer with warm weather but it rained yesterday.
Signature: the bug man

Sand Cricket or Sandkrieke

Sand Cricket or Sandkrieke

Dear bug man,
This is a Sand Cricket or Sandkrieke in the family Stenopelmatidae which includes the Potato Bugs or Jerusalem Crickets from North America, and their only living relatives are in Australia and South Africa.
  We located matching images on iSpot here and here.  Though they are not poisonous, they do have powerful mandibles that could deliver a painful bite, possibly even drawing blood.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination