From the monthly archives: "December 2014"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: scared to find this in house!
Location: Northern California
December 20, 2014 10:02 pm
Hello bugman – was just putting daughter to bed when she saw this crawling down the wall right behind her pillow! She said, “What is that?”
It went fairly easily into the cup and I was able to toss it outside where the spiders go . . . but I am wondering whether it’s a centipede, millipede, or something else? And should I be worried or is it harmless? Sorry if this is repetitive for you but to me this is completely new! Just for info I am in the suburbs of the East San Francisco Bay Area in California.
Thank you so much!
Signature: Dee

Soil Centipede

Soil Centipede

Dear Dee,
This appears to be a Soil Centipede in the order Geophilomorpha, and according to BugGuide they are:  “Slender, rather sluggish eyeless centipedes that have 27 to 191 pairs (the number of leg pairs is always odd) of legs and 14-segmented antennae. They burrow in the substrate in a manner similar to earthworms, by elongating and contracting their bodies.”
  According to MOBugs:  “No need to fear these centipedes, as they will not bite humans, and have no toxic venom to harm us even if they could. They prey on many harmful beetle larvae and help aerate the soil, much like earthworms do. Their rapid movements and subterranean habitat can make them a bit unnerving, but like all insects and their relatives, they have their purpose in the environment, and these guys are fun to watch!”  According to SFGate:  “Soil centipedes (geophilomorpha) are very small and possess many pairs of legs, often exceeding 60 pairs. These centipedes live in the ground, where they prey on subterranean insects. They are completely harmless.”  We don’t want to give the appearance of sensationalism, but we don’t want to discount the possibility of a Soil Centipede seeking shelter in a nasal passage, ear canal or other orifice, which we believe would be a very unlikely situation, however we did uncover some interesting information when we posted this account of a Soil Centipede.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Help! Fear of bed bug
Location: Milwaukee wi
December 17, 2014 3:48 pm
Please help me know what this is!! 6 legged. Was found crawling on my blanket. I fear it’s a bed bug. After I caught it I pierced it with a pin and it exploded with blood I’m afraid it’s a bed bug. What should I do? Is it possible to just have one or two and contain them without them spreading? I’m very concerned any help would be appreciated.
Signature: Joe

Bed Bug, probably

Bed Bug, probably

Dear Joe,
We cannot be certain due to the lack of clarity in your image, but in our opinion, this does appear to be a Bed Bug.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: mass of prickly caterpillars
Location: Toledo District, Belize
December 19, 2014 12:50 pm
Hi, Bug Folks,
I’ve seen individuals of this caterpillar in the past, but never masses like this. They are feeding on a common wild shrub called “polly redhead” in Belize. I’ve seen it in FL nurseries as “fire bush”.
So, WTB?
Thanks.
Signature: Tanya

Stinging Silkworms

Stinging Silkworms

Dear Tanya,
We believe these are stinging Silkmoth Caterpillars in the genus
Leucanella, but in doing some research, the only species we can substantiate from Belize is Leucanella acutissima, but we did not locate an image of the caterpillar.  We are going to contact Bill Oehlke to see if he can substantiate the species, and since he is lacking images of the caterpillar of  Leucanella acutissima, we suspect he may request permission to post  your images to his comprehensive site.  If this is another species in the genus, he may also want to request permission to post the images as a record of a new species in Belize.  We hope you will grant him permission.

Stinging Silkworms

Stinging Silkworms

Update:  We found some images of the caterpillar of Leucanella acutissima on Bio-Nica and they look correct.

Bill Oehlke responds
Daniel,
Those seem a good match for acutissima larvae. There are a couple of other species documented from Mexico that have not been documented fromBbelize, but I would not be surprised if they are also present
In Belize.
Bill

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: starstuck bug

Location: Toledo District, Belize
December 19, 2014 12:59 pm
Hello again, folks,
I’ve finally got good internet access and can try to send some photos for ID’ing. I haven’t been able to do that for ages.
Hope you have time to ID some of these.
Thanks a lot for a great site, always.
Signature: Tanya

Cricket

Cricket

Hi Tanya,
Your lovely images from Belize are much more interesting than the large number of Carpet Beetle and Brown Marmorated Stink Bug images we get from North America in the winter.  This Cricket reminds us of a North American Handsome Trig, so we suspect it may be in the same subfamily, Trigonidiinae, the Winged Bush Crickets which are profiled on BugGuide.  Again we are going to request assistance from Piotr Naskrecki who confirmed our identification of your Timber Fly.

Hello, Daniel,
Thank you for the encouraging words.  I have some more photos to send of other unknown bugs, but I’m not sure if my internet will send them along.  I’ll try during a lull in the holiday season.
We’ve never seen this cricket before.  It was quite content to sit on the fruit which I had picked, put in a bucket, carried to the counter, taken out of the bucket and was ready to wipe and bag.  Glad I got some decent photos before setting the cricket back outdoors.
Happy holidays.
Tanya

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: red white & black beetle
Location: Los Angeles, CA
December 19, 2014 9:39 pm
I thought this bug was pretty so I took a photograph of the design on it’s back. Later I couldn’t at all identify it, so I was hoping you would be able to help. It kept leaning away from me when I tried to take a picture. It was about a quarter of an inch long, including legs.
Thanks!
Signature: Caroline

Hello, I’m sorry to have bothered you, since I just identified the bug as Eurydema oleracea, a leaf beetle

African Painted Bug

African Painted Bug

Hi Caroline,
Though you have incorrectly identified the species, you do have the correct family. 
Eurydema oleracea which we located on British Bugs is not a Leaf Beetle.  It is a member of the family Pentatomidae, the Stink Bugs.  Your insect is an African Painted Bug, Bagrada hilaris, an invasive species that is damaging plants in the cabbage family including kale and collard greens.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Colorful beetle
Location: Chubut Province, Argentina
December 19, 2014 8:51 pm
While traveling in Patagonia near the Valdes Peninsula we saw this truly beautiful bug. The picture was taken in mid-November. We were close to the Atlantic Ocean. I have looked through the web trying to identify. I hope you may have an answer. Thank you,
Signature: Homer Shell

Unknown Beetle

Lady Beetle

Dear Homer,
This is sure a colorful and distinctive looking beetle.  Our first inclination is to speculate it is a Leaf Beetle in the family Chrysomelidae.  We will attempt a more specific identification and we hope to get some assistance from our readership.

Lady Beetle identification courtesy of Karl
Hi Daniel and Homer Shell:
Although it really doesn’t look like one, this is actually a Lady Beetle (a.k.a. Ladybug or Ladybird). The species is Eriopis connexa (Coccinellidae: Coccinellinae) and it is one of the most wide spread beetles in South America. Like most Lady beetles, it is a voracious predator of aphids and is widely used for biological control of pests on crops such as maize and sorghum.
lRegards.  Karl

Thanks very much to Daniel and Karl for the ID.  You were a great help.
Homer Shell

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination