From the monthly archives: "December 2014"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is it?
Location: Southwest Western Australia (Leschenault Inlet)
December 24, 2014 8:12 pm
Hi! I’m trying to determine what type of insect this is. At first glance it looks like a giant mosquito, but then I started researching and thought it could be a crane fly, or maybe a lacewing? No idea, but it’s driving me crazy not knowing!
Signature: Cath

Ichneumon

Ichneumon

Hi Cath,
Mistaking this Ichneumon for a Crane Fly is understandable.  Ichneumons are parasitic wasp that comprise one of the largest families of creatures on our planet.  Ichneumons are considered to be harmless to humans, though some species are capable of stinging.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Help – Bug in appartment
Location: Philly
December 21, 2014 11:56 pm
Hi,
Recently, we keep finding these bugs in our apartment around 1-5am (once a week).
These things are very fast but I finally managed to catch of of them alive.
Signature: Jon

Brownbanded Cockroach

Brownbanded Cockroach

Dear Jon,
We believe we have correctly identified your Cockroach as a Brownbanded Cockroach,
Supella longipalpa, based on this image posted to BugGuide.  According to the Penn State Entomology site:  “Brownbanded cockroaches prefer warm and dry locations, such as near refrigerator motor housings, on the upper walls of cabinets, and inside pantries, closets, dressers, and furniture in general. They can also be found behind picture frames and beneath tables and chairs, and inside clocks, radios, light switch plates, doorframes, and dressers. It is common to find them hiding nearer the ceiling than the floor and away from water sources. Accurate identification is paramount to controlling brownbanded cockroaches. Control strategies for other cockroaches will not be efficacious for brownbanded cockroaches.”

Thanks Daniel, that looks so right.
I’ve contacted the apartment manager to send in an exterminator and have a look at it,
Happy holidays!
Jon

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Caterpiller in Uberlandia, MG Brasil
Location: Uberlandia, Minas Gerias, Brasil
December 24, 2014 11:09 am
I just found this catepiller on the wall of my office. It is huge, 10cm to 12cm in length, with a red head. See the attached photos.
Signature: Craig Snively

Pachylia syces syces Caterpillar

Pachylia syces syces Caterpillar

Dear Craig,
This is a caterpillar of a Sphinx Moth,
Pachylia syces syces, and it does not have a common name.  According to the Sphingidae of the Americas site, the caterpillars feed on the leaves of various plants in the genus Ficus, which includes figs.

Thanks Daniel. Happy Holidays and thanks for the information.
Abraço from Brasil
Craig

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: bee indentification
Location: west bengal, india
December 24, 2014 9:57 am
i would love to know which bee it is. it looks like a mutated form of bee.regards.
Signature: sreeradha seth

Flower Fly

Flower Fly

Dear Sreeradha Seth,
This is not a bee, but rather a fly in the family Syrphidae that is mimicking a bee.  Commonly called Flower Flies or Hover Flies, members of the family Syrphidae do not sting.  Your individual looks very similar to this Flower Fly from India we posted in the spring.  We were not successful with an identification to the species or genus level.

Flower Fly

Flower Fly

Thank you very much for identifying the bug. It was very helpful.
Regards,Sreeradha Seth

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Eggs? Rodeo Beach Wetland, Marin, CA
Location: wetland by Rodeo Beach, Marin, CA
December 20, 2014 12:14 pm
Hi,
I work in habitat restoration and came across these very small egg-like things growing on cape ivy vegetation in a wetland area. I’ve also observed them on water parsley in the same location. They’re about the size of a very small pinhead and are attached to the plant by a short, dark-colored stalk. Any ideas???
Signature: Marion

Eggs Possibly

Eggs Possibly

Dear Marion,
These look like they might be eggs, but we do not recognize them.  The stalks are interesting.  Many insects in the order Neuroptera including Lacewings (see here and here) have eggs on stalks, but they look nothing like the images you have supplied.  We will continue to research this and we hope our readership will write in with any suggestions.

Eggs Possibly

Eggs Possibly

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Spider Zoropsis spinimana
Location: Oakland, California, USA
December 22, 2014 6:01 pm
I found this fellow (and I do believe it is a male) lurking on my living room wall in Oakland, California. At just over 2″ he’s too big to live with comfortably. So, into a capture jar, smile for a close up and then away to the garden with you.
I was able to get a few good photos and with a quick internet search had the spider ID. Seems that Zoropsis spinimana is an exotic introduction to Northern California and is native to the Mediterranean. Our local nature authority, the California Academy of Sciences of San Francisco, has been tracking its spread since it was first found in the San Jose area in the mid-1990’s.
It’s not aggressive, slow moving and not believed to be harmful. Likes crawlspaces, attics and houses.
I’ve written to you to help out others like myself who are curious about these critters.
Signature: JP

False Wolf Spider:  Zoropsis spinimana

False Wolf Spider: Zoropsis spinimana

Dear JP,
Thanks so much for your well researched submission and the helpful information you have provided for our readership.  As you have indicated, BugGuide states:  “Native to the Mediterranean coastal countries and northern Africa” and BugGuide also reports:  “This is the only species in the family found in BugGuide’s range.”  According to the UC Davis website:  “In the mid-1990s,
Zoropsis spinimana, a large spider from the Mediterranean region, started showing up in homes around the San Francisco Bay area. It has since become well established around the southern, eastern, and northern portions of the Bay and has become a permanent member of the California spider population. Although the known distribution is not very extensive, this spider does inhabit a part of the state that is densely populated by humans and Zoropsis is routinely found in homes, causing concern among the people who encounter it. However, it is harmless to people. This Pest Note was prepared to provide information regarding this non-native resident.  The first California reports of Zoropsis spinimana were from the Sunnyvale area in Santa Clara County in 1992. Since then the spider has mostly spread north and east around the San Francisco Bay area with specimens found throughout Santa Clara, San Mateo, Alameda, Marin, and Santa Cruz Counties. Scientists at the California Academy of Sciences in San Francisco are tracking the spider’s spread. So far, Zoropsis spinimana seems to be found only in and around human dwellings. However, it is also possible that this spider is establishing itself in natural vegetation areas.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination