From the monthly archives: "December 2014"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Can’t quite identify this caterpillar
Location: Florida
December 2, 2014 1:19 pm
Hello, I found this guy sitting outside my house and decided to take a picture, upon trying to identify him I ran into some trouble as the closest I could find was the Buck Moth Larvae or the Spiny Elm Caterpillar but both of these describe spots as the primary pattern and my buddy here has what seem to be long white and orange stripes, which is a feature neither have mentioned! I live in central Florida.
Signature: -Curiouser and Curiouser

Gulf Fritillary Caterpillar

Gulf Fritillary Caterpillar

Dear Curiouser and Curiouser,
This looks like a Gulf Fritillary Caterpillar,
Agraulis vanillae, a species that feeds on the leaves of passionflower vines, and it is generally not found far from the food plants.  This is a color variation with lavendar stripes and according to BugGuide:  “Larvae are generally orange with black branched spines and greenish-black stripes. There is a larval variant with purple/lavender stripes, seen mostly in Texas.”  Adult Gulf Fritillaries are pretty orange butterflies with silver spots.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this
Location: St. Louis
December 1, 2014 6:45 pm
Finding these in my basement all the time. I live in St. Louis, not near a river. Near hwys 170 and 64. Let me know. They hop very fast away when scared. What would you suggest I do about getting rid of these in a non harmful way
Signature: Brad

Camel Cricket

Camel Cricket

Dear Brad,
Camel Crickets prefer damp and dark conditions that are generally found in basements.  Making your basement brighter and drier should help.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: bug in Suriname (South America)
Location: suriname
December 2, 2014 1:38 pm
Hi there,
My family in Suriname saw this colorful bug in their garden..
Do you know what it is?
Thanks a lot!
Sam (Holland)
Signature: sam

Probably Coreid Bug

Probably Coreid Bug

Dear Sam,
We are relatively certain that this True Bug is in the family Coreidae, the Leaf Footed Bugs, but we have not been able to identify it to the species level.  Perhaps one of our readers will be able to provide a more specific identification.
  We tried unsuccessfully to identify it on Cesar Crash’s Brazilian site Insetologia.

Update:  December 5, 2014
Thanks to a comment by Cesar Crash, we now know that this is
Pachylis pharaonis.  It is pictured  on Coreoidae.speciesfile and on Animals Animals.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Leafwing Butterflies
Location: Wichita County, North Texas, USA
December 1, 2014 11:36 am
I snapped these two photos of what I presume are leafwing butterflies in my backyard on November 29, 2014. Is there a way to narrow down their identification? They were feasting on old bananas.
Signature: Anna

Leafwing

Leafwing

Dear Anna,
This is indeed one of three Leafwing species in the genus
Anaea found in the U.S., however only two species are reported from Florida.  We are uncertain if this is a Tropical Leafwing or a Goatweed Leafwing.  Perhaps someone with more experience with Leafwings can identify the species.  BugGuide does not offer a means of distinguishing the two species, and we can try figuring out their differences by reading Jeffrey Glassberg’s “Butterflies Through Binoculars, The West”.  That excellent guide book does have range maps, and only the Goatweed Leafwing, Anaea andria, is found in North Texas, so that is our best guess.  We would not rule out the possibility that Global Warming may have increased the range of the Tropical Leafwing.

Leafwing

Leafwing

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Identification Needed!
Location: Georgia
December 1, 2014 7:56 pm
Hi! I am trying to identify numerous insects for an entomology course. My project is due in two days so I am desperate to identify these insects. Every insect I have came from the middle Georgia area and were found between August-November. Please identify as many as you can! I know the picture quality is not the best so even a guess will work! I will submit 3 photos per insect for you to see multiple views. I will be very grateful for your help!
Signature: Thank you so much!

Double Banded Scoliid

Double Banded Scoliid

We do not plan to call off work today to respond to your desperate plea to identify all the insects in the fifteen emails you sent last night.  We suggest that you use BugGuide and our own archives to do your own identifications based on the wealth of knowledge we are presuming you were taught in your course.  The most popular posting on our site continues to be What’s That Bug? Will Not Do Your Child’s Homework.  You need to pass (or fail) on your own.

Ed. Note:  This is a Double Banded Scoliid, Scolia bicincta, which can be verified on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: White crab spider in Ecuador
Location: Puerto Lopez, Manabi Province, Ecuador
November 27, 2014 7:26 pm
November 25, 2014, which was a clear day in the middle of several overcast days.
This seems to be a spider in the family Thomisidae but I am trying to determine which subfamily. It was on this clothes pin on our clothes line. When I took the pin off of the line, I noticed the spider and dropped it on the deck. That is where it stayed while I took the picture.
Do you know which subfamily it belongs to?
Signature: Emily in Ecuador

Crab Spider

Crab Spider

Dear Emily,
To the best of our knowledge, subfamilies in the family Thomisidae are not recognized.  Your spider resembles members of the genus
Misumena that are known as Flower Spiders and in North America.  You can read more about the genus on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination