From the monthly archives: "November 2014"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Orange bug~
Location: Western Maryland
November 22, 2014 12:26 pm
I was doing some cleaning around my apartment and I went to move my exercise ball and found this orange striped beauty. I have never seen one like it before. I took a picture of it then moved it outside.
Signature: Bugs are Friends

Checkered Beetle

Checkered Beetle

This is a Checkered Beetle in the family Cleridae, possibly Enoclerus muttkowskii which is pictured on BugGuide.  Checkered Beetles, according to BugGuide, are;:  “predaceous on other insects, larvae mostly on wood- and cone-borers; some adults feed on pollen; a few species are scavengers.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Trying to identify bug in pool
Location: Martinique
November 22, 2014 10:00 am
Can you help identify what this is please ?
I found it swimming in our pool after a few days of heavy rains.
Signature: Matthew

Backswimmers

Backswimmers

Dear Matthew,
These aquatic true bugs are Backswimmers in the family Notonectidae.  According to BugGuide they are:  “Aquatic bugs that often swim upside-down. When resting at the surface, body is typically tilted with the head downward”
and they “Prey on other aquatic insects and sometimes on small vertebrates.”  Backswimmers can fly, which enables them to seek a new home if their pond dries out.  We don’t know what would have caused them to relocate to your pool after the rains.

Daniel,
Thank you very much for your reply.
Fantastic info. My son has taken matters into his own hands and relocated them to another improvised pool. They’re doing well.
Can they fly far ? Perhaps the winds carried them a little further than normal.
Also, my pool is a salt based pool rather than chlorine, would that allow them to survive better than in the latter ?

Dear Matthew,
Since Backswimmers are predators, they will not remain in a body of water that does not provide a food supply.  Insects will not live in a chlorinated pool, but many insects will fall into the water.  Backswimmers are air breathers, and if the chlorine is not strong, we imagine they can survive in a chlorinated pool.  We also believe there are some species that can inhabit brackish water, which is a blend of fresh and salt water.  They can fly considerable distances.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this bug?
Location: Houston tx
November 21, 2014 11:19 pm
We found on patio and would like to know what it is. Is it dangerous,poisonous, etc.
Signature: Cc

Asp

Asp

Dear Cc,
Your image is quite blurry, but this appears to be an Asp, the stinging caterpillar of a Southern Flannel Moth.  The Asp is notorious in the south where its sting is reported to be quite painful.
  Additional information on the Asp is available on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Insect eggs on citrus leaf
Location: Houston TX
November 20, 2014 8:14 pm
This was on the top leaf of a 2 year old grafted citrus. I haven’t seen it before and was interested to know what it is.
Thanks
Signature: Mickey

Katydid Eggs

Katydid Eggs

Hi Mickey,
These are Katydid EggsKatydids are relatives of Grasshoppers and most North American Katydids are green.  They are solitary feeders, and though they eat leaves (and rose blossoms in our garden) they do not do significant damage.  We allow Katydids to feed off the plants in our garden because they in turn provide food for other predators, including insect eating birds.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Giant wood-boring flying insect
Location: Rural Bangladesh
November 20, 2014 7:13 pm
My husband took this picture in rural Bangladesh. He says it was a wood-boring insect, about 3 inches long, and that it died right in front of him (he didn’t kill it). The eyes and wings are just amazing.
Signature: Lisa C.

Carpenter Bee

Carpenter Bee

Dear Lisa,
This amazing insect is a Carpenter Bee in the subfamily Xylocopinae.  The female tunnels in wood, creating several nursery chambers that she provisions with pollen.  She lays an egg in each chamber so that her developing larva will have a food source.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Beetles
Location: South Africa
November 21, 2014 4:23 am
Hello. I have been trying to identify this “heart beetle”- do you perhaps know what it is called? I found it on my chair at Kruger National Park in South Africa in October (Spring). The other beetle is just really pretty – amazing colours! Found by the car in a parking lot in Rustenburg, South Africa in November (Summer). Thanks 🙂
Signature: Kareen

Fruit Chafer

Fruit Chafer

Dear Kareen,
Our favorite place to identify South African insects is iSpot where we identified your Fruit Chafer as
Pedinorrhina trivittata.  We believe the green beetle is a Leaf Beetle, and we will do a unique posting of it eventually.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination