From the monthly archives: "November 2014"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Feathery tailed moth
Location: New Orleans
November 22, 2014 10:58 pm
Hi!
Found this bug at the local farmers market in New Orleans. It appears to be a black and white moth with a feathery tail. Any clues to what it is?
Thanks!
Signature: Milk n moths

Melonworm Moth

Melonworm Moth

Hi Milk n moths,
This Melonworm Moth gets its common name because the caterpillars “feed on cucumber family plants: cucumber, melon, squash” according to BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Just seen three of these????
Location: Louisiana
November 22, 2014 9:27 pm
I live in Louisiana and have never seen these before and have seen 3 tonite
Signature: Tara

Mole Cricket

Mole Cricket

Hi Tara,
Mole Crickets are subterranean diggers that are also capable of flying.  Perhaps the frequent sightings are related to heavy rains.  Some subterranean species come to the surface if their burrows are flooded.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Pretty Cockroach
Location: perth region western australia
November 23, 2014 6:34 am
Hi there,
I know there are a lot of people out there that would argue there is no such thing as a “pretty” cockroach, but I have the photographic evidence! The specimen in question was discovered sheltering from the rain in a curled Mulberry tree leaf…. smart as well as pretty! Although the photograph is obviously magnified, it was actually only 5mm long at the most. I have searched through the internet in vain trying to identify it and finally figured if anyone can identify it for me, it would be you guys! Please see the attached photographs and thank you for your time.
Signature: Jill

Cockroach

Cockroach

Dear Jill,
This really is a pretty immature Cockroach.  Most people don’t realize that only a few species of Cockroaches infest homes, and the vast majority of Cockroaches are benign creatures, and that many of them are quite attractive.
  We believe we have correctly identified your immature Cockroach on the Brisbane Insect website as Ellipsidion humerale, commonly called the Small Ellipsidion.

Cockroach

Cockroach

Hi Daniel,
Thanks so much for your speedy reply.
It’s annoying that people have no appreciation for bugs and spiders and have such an irrational fear of them. They can’t seem to see the bugs have far more to fear from us than we from them… if we were bug sized that might well be a different story of course! lol
Thanks again. Your reply and identification was much appreciated.
Jill

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Weird moth type bug
Location: Johannesburg, south Africa
November 23, 2014 11:46 am
Hi
I live in South Africa and found an insect I have never seen before. Can you assist?
Signature: Rudi

Diurnal Hawkmoth

Diurnal Hawkmoth

Dear Rudi,
This is a diurnal Hawkmoth in the family Sphingidae.  We believe it is a Pellucid Hawkmoth,
Cephonodes hylas, which according to African Moths, is found in South Africa.  It is also pictured on Africa Wild.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Honduras- Spider
Location: El Ocote, Honduras
November 19, 2014 7:35 pm
HI, I visited the forests of Honduras and came across this beautiful spider! The body was easily the size of my palm, and its legs longer than my fingers!!! It was on a rock, that was in the middle of a creek. This was in easternHonduras, in the forests outside the small community of El Ocote.
The back part of the body had mostly black, but was fat and round. The legs were banded with black and brown stripes.
This beauty was easily larger than my hand when we took the legs into account. No web that I could see.
Sadly I asked our military escort to grab this pic and we couldn’t get much closer due to the creek and safety reasons…. when i asked him what type this was, all he said was spider in Spanish.
Signature: Curious Traveler

Unknown Spider

Long Legged Fishing Spider

Dear Curious Traveler,
Your image is too blurry for an identification.

Can you identify this Spider?
or if not,any educated guesses?
A better description is as follows:
Long thin legs with alternating black and brown bands, each leg aprox  6 inches long.
Abdomen/body aprox 4 inches long.
Fangs were aprox half an inch.
The  main body was just a  plain brown and then the back part of the body was all brown with no markings then it faded to black, no markings again.
Location: found on a rock in the middle of a creek  in the woods about 45 mins outside the village of El Ocote in eastern Honduras. NO web nearby.
Time: middle of afternoon aprox 12noon, on august 25th 2014.

We will post your blurry image and give our readership a chance at identification.

Update:  Long Legged Fishing Spider
Thanks to a comment from Cesar Crash who runs our sister site Insetologia out of Brazil, we believe this is a Long Legged Fishing Spider in the family Trechaleidae.  Both the shape of the spider and the behavior that is described in the submission fit for this family.

Oh wow thank you! I’m sorry I could not get a better picture but it is nice to get an idea 🙂
Looking up pics online and it does look a lot like the spider. The body in the back is slightly off, but  I think that may have been it! Thank you!

Update from Karl:  December 17, 2014
Hi Daniel and Curious Traveler:
Regarding the poster’s comment that the “body in the back is slightly off”, it’s because his/her photo is of a female carrying an egg sac. Trechaleid spiders produce a rather distinctive flat, disc-shaped and camouflaged egg sac that the females carry around attached to the underside of her abdomen. Regards.  Karl

Thanks Karl,
If Curious Traveler had taken an image with the high quality of the link you provided, it would have made identification considerably easier.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: identification
Location: Hartbeespoort, South Africa
November 18, 2014 3:27 am
Good day, I saw this one in my garden on 7th november this year. Later it was on the ground, and an hour later gone. I live in North West Province in South Africa.
Signature: Carla

Probably Flannel Moth

Rayed Slug Moth

Dear Carla,
Your moth bears a striking resemblance to North and Central American Flannel Moths in the family Megalopygidae, and we believe your moth is also a member of that family, however, we are currently unable to verify that identification on iSpot as the site is currently unavailable.  Perhaps when iSpot solves its technical problems, we can provide you with a species name.

Flannel Moth, we believe

Rayed Slug Moth

Baie dankie, saw the answer on ispot: Rayed Slug Moth
Groetjes,
Walter & Carla

Thanks for providing that information so that we can correct the posting of this Rayed Slug Moth from the family Limacodidae.  We are linking to the iSpot page that now includes your sighting.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination