From the monthly archives: "November 2014"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Green Orchid Bee
Location: 76016 Arlington, TX
November 29, 2014 2:50 pm
This was taken today in Arlington, TX. We’ve seen several of these today humming around the garden. Temps are unseasonably warm, but will cool down tomorrow.
Signature: Lisa Parisot

Metallic Green Sweat Bee

Metallic Green Sweat Bee

Dear Lisa,
To the best of our knowledge, the Green Orchid Bee is not found in Arlington, Texas.  It is an introduced species and according to BugGuide it is a member of a:  “neotropical group, with 1 sp. established in so. FL and recorded from southernmost TX (Brownsville)”
  This is a Metallic Green Sweat Bee in the subfamily Halictinae, and you can read more about them on BugGuide where it states:  “Most species nest in burrows in banks or in the ground (Augochlora uses partially rotten logs). Some are primitively eusocial; in such cases usually a female guards the entrance to the burrow by plugging it with her head. Generally the main burrow is vertical; it sends horizontal branches, each branch ending in a solitary cell.”  It can be very difficult to identify Metallic Green Sweat Bees to the genus or species level from images. 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Funny looking catterpilar
Location: Randfontein South Africa
November 29, 2014 6:04 am
Hi I just found this guy under attack by a bunch of ants, saved it and placed it on a strawberry leaf to photograph. (Don’t think that is the diet of this caterpillar)
The closest pic I could find on the net is of the one eyed sphinx moth from Alaska. This however is in Randfontein South Africa. Any ideas?
Kind regards
Vic
Signature: Vic Mouton

Probably Nymphalidae Caterpillar

Moth Caterpillar

Dear Vic,
Though it has a caudal horn, we do not believe this is a Hornworm.  We believe this is a Butterfly Caterpillar, not a moth caterpillar, and we believe it is in the Brush Footed Butterfly Nymphalidae.  We have not had any luck finding any matching images online, and we have contacted butterfly caterpillar specialist Keith Wolfe to see if he can identify your caterpillar.

Probably Nymphalidae Caterpillar

Moth Caterpillar

Correction Courtesy of Keith Wolfe
Hi Daniel; I hope you had a wonderful Thanksgiving!  This is definitely not a nymphalid (butterfly) larva of any sort, but rather an immature moth.  Sorry to be of limited help.
Best wishes,
Keith

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this
Location: Australia, port Stephens
November 29, 2014 3:50 am
Had this fly on our door an was a beast, wondering what it is
Signature: Email

Cicada

Cicada

This is a Cicada and many people mistake Cicadas for large flies.  Australia is the home of numerous, diverse species of Cicadas and we will attempt a species identification for you.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: can Pholcus phalangioides change its coloration to match its environment?
Location: Jefferson County, Illinois
November 28, 2014 6:35 pm
Hello!
I am extremely nature friendly and generally let spiders have the run of my house within reason. This year I had a bumper crop of cellar spiders and although I find them interesting, their webs can get to be an issue and I am constantly tidying up after them. Not long ago I noticed a silk-wrapped stilt bug hanging down by the kitchen table and as I bent down to brush it away I noticed something luminous and bright green on it. Upon closer inspection I was fascinated to find that I had discovered both dinner and diner and , most importantly, the diner appeared to be one of “my” cellar spiders that had somehow turned a strange shade of green I’ve never seen before! All of the cellar spiders I have seen here are various shades of tan, brown, or even a light translucent grey, but never this bright green. Even stranger, the spider has been residing among a collection of volleyball trophies on my tabletop and the background color in these trophies is the exact shade of green. Initially I thought well yes, if you are looking at the spider at the right time of day with the right light, the abdomen is likely reflecting the green from the trophies. But the cephalothorax is the expected color, as are the legs, and even in dim light or shadow you can still see the bright green. So I am puzzled and intrigued.
I am aware that many creatures can manipulate their background color but is there anything known about cellar spiders having this ability? If she ( I say she, I can’t see any pedipalps without disturbing the spider) weren’t so fragile I would put her in a different location and watch for changes but I don’t want to harm her.
Anyway I hope I can load the pictures correctly so you can have a look-see.
thank you !
WT
Signature: Wendy T.

Green Cellar Spider or something else???

Green Cellar Spider or something else???

Dear Wendy,
This sure looks like a Cellar Spider, but the green coloration is certainly unusual.  We are going to post your images and attempt to research this more thoroughly before we weigh in with an opinion, and hopefully one of our readers can either provide a definitive identification or comment on the coloration.

Possibly Green Cellar Spider

Possibly Green Cellar Spider

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Lovely green bug crawled out of my salad!
Location: Bronx, NY
November 27, 2014 7:35 pm
Hi! I found this guy on my salad plate on Thanksgiving. It was an Earthboubd Farms arugula salad. My hostess assured me the greens had come right out of the box. We are in the Bronx & I don’t want to put him outside for fear of the cold. I placed him on a houseplant & he relocated himself to a sweet potato that he was reluctant to leave. What is he??
Signature: Priscilla

Say's Stink Bug

Say’s Stink Bug

Dear Priscilla,
This Stink Bug looks like a Say’s Stink Bug,
Chlorochroa sayi, a species that is found, according to BugGuide, west of the Mississippi River.  We could not find Earthboubd Farms, but seeing as the n is next to the b on the keyboard, we are assuming you made a typographical error and are referring to an organic farm in California known for packaged, prewashed greens.  This should be a lesson to all folks who buy prewashed greens that it doesn’t hurt to do a quick once over to ensure there is no unwanted protein in the salad. 

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Is this a kissing bug?
Location: Texas Hill Country
November 26, 2014 2:33 pm
Help! We just moved to the Texas hillcountry and found this big in iur doorway and we’re afraid it’s a kissing bug. It’s belly is light colored and and there appear to be a slight differences in the coloring, the orange line is solid instead of dashes for example. Help us we’re pretty afraid of the possibility of Chagas’ disease.
Signature: Chelsea

Leaf Footed Bug

Leaf Footed Bug

Hi Chelsea,
There is a superficial similarity between the appearance of your Leaf Footed Bug,
Catorhintha selector, and a Kissing Bug because they are in the same suborder, Heteroptera, the True Bugs, but unlike the Kissing Bug, your insect is harmless.  We identified your Leaf Footed Bug on BugGuide.

Thank you so much! On another note, about 2 hours later we also found this bug (photo attached) in our breakfast area, my husband seems to think it is a kissing bug in the nymph stage from looking it up. Hope we’re wrong about this one too!
Best,
Chelsea

Immature Kissing Bug, we believe

Immature Kissing Bug, we believe

Dear Chelsea,
Alas, this time we are in agreement with your husband.  Though the image lacks critical sharpness, this really does resemble an immature Kissing Bug in the genus Triatoma.  You can see the resemblance to this image posted to BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination