From the monthly archives: "November 2014"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

 

November 1, 2014
Location:  Elyria Canyon Park, Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
This past weekend, while planting native wildflowers in Elyria Canyon Park, I couldn’t resist taking a few images of this lovely Painted Lady.

Painted Lady

Painted Lady

Painted Lady

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Beautiful Saturniid Caterpillar

Saturniid Caterpillar, possibly in genus Automeris

Saturniid Caterpillar, possibly in genus Automeris

Subject: Not sure about this little friends
Location: Panama, Chiriqui province
November 3, 2014 7:48 am
Here in Panamá is common the encounters with worms if you live near forest zones. Here two species that I want to know more about. I think the fist one can be a hawkmoth caterpillar and the second one maybe a silkmoth caterpillar. Thanks in advance, bugman.
Signature: KLS

Possibly Automeris species

Possibly Automeris species

Dear KLS,
We agree with your identifications, but alas, we haven’t the time right now to investigate further.  Your images and the caterpillars are both wonderful.  We believe the Silkmoth Caterpillar may be in the genus
Automeris, or a closely related genus. Perhaps one of our readers can investigate this further.  We will also try to contact Bill Oehlke to see if he has any ideas.

Hornworm

Hornworm:  Manduca pellenia

Nice pictures of amazing animals!
The Saturnid caterpillar is probably of an Automeris species indeed.
The Sphingid caterpillar is most likely a Manduca pellenia.
Nice wishes from Berlin,
Bostjan

Thanks Bostjan,
We will search for some appropriate links.

Ed. Note November 4, 2014:  Identification submissions to What’s That Bug? can include three attachments and very few folks actually attach all three.  In instances where three images are submitted, we generally only post two.  We are retroactively amending this posting to contain the third image as all three are so beautiful.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Black Beetle
Location: Gard, France
November 2, 2014 3:31 am
Hello!
Could you tell me what kind of beetle this is? I frequently see them wandering around the garden – when picked up, they grab onto your finger and then cover it in some kind of weird red liquid.
I assume they’re trying to pretend they bit you?
Either way, as such a frequent visitor, it’s a bit annoying not knowing their name!
Signature: Kinyonga

Darkling Beetle

Leaf Beetle

Dear Kinyonga,
The best we are able to provide at this time is a family name.  This is a Darkling Beetle in the family
Tenebrionidae.  We did a quick search but could not find any matching images with identifications.  Perhaps one of our readers will have better luck with a species name.

Darkling Beetle

Leaf Beetle

Ed. Note:  Thanks to a comment from beetlehunter, we now know that this is actually a Leaf Beetle, Timarcha tenebricosa, which is well represented in online images including these images on Nature Spot and Panoramio.  Nature Spot indicates the common name Bloody-Nose Beetle and states:  “It earns its common name from its peculiar form of defence; when threatened it exudes a drop of bright red fluid from the mouth. The larvae are a metallic bluish colour.”  That is illustrated on Fotonatura.  It is very interesting that the species name in the binomial shares the same root as the family name Tenebrionidae, so the resemblance Darkling Beetles was noted by Fabricius when he named the beetle in 1775. 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: what is this….
Location: Davis, CA
November 1, 2014 5:08 pm
Hello, Do you know what these are? They were found in our persimmon tree. Thanks.
Signature: No need

Red Humped Caterpillars

Red Humped Caterpillars

Dear No need,
These Red Humped Caterpillars,
Schizura concinna, ” feed on a wide range of woody plants, from many different families” according to BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: My friend is a Peace Corps volunteer in Senegal and found THIS fascinating spider…
Location: Kedougou Region of Senegal
November 2, 2014 8:46 pm
Hi Bugman!
My friend is volunteering in the Kedougou Region of Senegal. He found this spider while walking on a dirt path at night walking from Wouridje back to Thianguey.
I know the photo is from at night, but any ideas as to what it might be? I thought perhaps a Hunstman spider?
Thanks so much!
Signature: Trying to help going to Senegal more appealing…

Possible Wolf Spider

Possible Wolf Spider

We do not believe this is a Huntsman Spider.  The shape reminds us more of a Wolf Spider, but alas, the eye pattern is not visible in your image.  Perhaps one of our readers can offer additional information.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Caterpillar swarm in Costa Rica
Location: Costa Rica higher elevation
October 31, 2014 9:12 am
These caterpillars(?) appear seasonally in the higher elevations in Costa Rica. (1500m/5000′ MSL). They are 3-4″ long and appear to burrow as a group in the ground (in our yard and surrounding farmlands).
We don’t know what they are (or whether they are a problem?) but they have a marvelous locomotion. They crawl on top of each other for awhile, then they all pause as if catching their breath, then resume. This video was taken on the road outside our house.
What are they and do they benefit or damage the plants and animals?
Signature: Bugged in Costa Rica

Sawfly Larva

Sawfly Larva

Dear Bugged in Costa Rica,
We do not believe these are Caterpillars.  We believe they are Sawfly Larvae, relatives of wasps and bees.  There are Australian Sawfly Larvae known as Spitfires that look similar.

Aggregation of Sawfly Larvae

Aggregation of Sawfly Larvae

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination