From the monthly archives: "November 2014"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug in babies belly button
Location: Philadelphia, PA
November 3, 2014 8:25 am
Dear Mr. Bugman,
I was changing my 13month old sons diaper today when I noticed something in his belly button. When I got a Q-Tip to clean it out I saw that it was some sort of bug. As you could imagine I was freaked out and have been trying to research what types of bug it is so I know what I need to do to get rid of these bug so he does not get bites ect…. I saw online pictures of carpet beetle but they looked hairy so I am lost. Any tips would be great since I am just so freaked out.
Thanks in advance to your attention to this matter!
Signature: Concerned Mom -Megan B (Ed. Note:  name withheld out of discretion)

Carpet Beetle Larva

Carpet Beetle Larva

Dear Megan,
We have edited your surname out of discretion and to prevent any future trauma this posting might have caused to you or your son had you been easily identified.  This looks like the larva of a Carpet Beetle, a harmless household pest that feeds on organic substances in the home, including pet hair, though we have never heard of navel lint being a source of food.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Help with bug ID
Location: San Diego county
November 4, 2014 7:28 am
Hi, I was wondering if you could help me ID these guys. I’m in San Diego county. They have been around for a couple of months but are starting to clump up like this now. They don’t seem to eat any plants that I care about, so I’m just curious.
Thanks!
Signature: Iris

Mediterranean Red Bug Aggregation

Mediterranean Red Bug Aggregation

Hi Iris,
This is an exotic, invasive, Mediterranean Red Bug,
Scantius aegyptius, aggregation.  According to The Center for Invasive Species Research at UC Riverside:  “The literature contains very little information regarding the biology of S. aegyptius and Scantius species in general are not considered to be economically important species.  In California, Scantius has been observed feeding on the developing seeds and stems of Knotweed (Polygonum spp.) and Malva (Malva parviflora).  It is likely that S. aegyptius will feed on the seeds of several species of annual herbaceous plants.  The most noticeable impact of S. aegyptius in California will likely be the presence of large numbers of nymphs and adults migrating from drying annual weeds into adjacent developed areas.  These migrations consisting of thousands of individuals can be very conspicuous and lead to large aggregations on small patches of host plants causing concern to local residents who notice these obvious aggregations.”

Mediterranean Red Bug Aggregation

Mediterranean Red Bug Aggregation

Great to know. Thanks so much for your help. They haven’t caused any trouble, unlike the dreaded Bagrada bug that has been gobbling up all my crops.
Have a good night.
Iris

Those African Painted Bugs, Bagrada hilaris, are a big problem to California crops.

I have been covering all my fall brassicas with row cover and burying the edges completely with dirt to seal the tunnels. This seems to work to keep the Bagrada bugs away until the weather gets cold. A lot more work, but without doing that they devour everything.
Thanks again for your help. Glad the Mediterranean Red Bug isn’t interested in eating my crops too.
Iris

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: unknown insect
Location: Conway, SC
November 4, 2014 6:24 am
Curious as to what insect this is. I discovered it in my meyer lemon tree in Conway, SC.
Signature: ?

Ailanthus Webworm

Ailanthus Webworm

Dear ?,
This is a moth known as an Ailanthus Webworm Moth, and though it is an Ermine Moth native to North America, it has adapted to feeding on the leaves of the invasive, exotic Tree of Heaven while in the caterpillar stage.  This Ailanthus Webworm poses no threat to your Meyer lemon tree, and it might even assist in pollination, though we believe Honey Bees do a good job in that process.

Thank you so much! Your knowledge and fast response is greatly appreciated. Thank you again,
Jim Sambroak

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Tiny mantis nymphs in Melbourne
Location: Melbourne, Australia
November 4, 2014 6:55 pm
Hello,
I found these two little mantis nymphs on a capsicum plant in my little boy’s veggie patch yesterday. They would have been no more than 10mm in length. I guess they’re juvenile Garden or False Garden Mantises, but I’ve not seen black/brown ones before, or ones with a curled abdomen.
My little boy is a budding entomologist, so we’re going to have a lot of fun watching these guys grow up. 🙂
(Apologies for the quality of the photos – I only had my phone handy!)
Signature: Jen

Mantis nymph

Mantis nymph

Dear Jen,
We hope to get additional images as these hatchling Mantids grow and mature.

Hatchling Mantids

Hatchling Mantids

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Male Native Mantis
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
October 26, 2014
A true harbinger of autumn in our Mount Washington garden is the appearance of one or more California Mantids.  Male California Mantids are more often encountered at porch lights.  Female California Mantids may be less mobile as they do not have wings.

Male California Mantis

Male California Mantis

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this bug?
Location: Ohio
November 3, 2014 11:14 pm
Yesterday, November 3rd on a sunny day around 54 degrees in Englewood Ohio, we saw this large flying bug crawling up the side of my parents shed. Never seen one like it before.
Signature: Scott Stewart

Wheel Bug

Wheel Bug

Hi Scott,
This is a predatory, beneficial Wheel Bug.  They mature in the autumn and they often attract attention as they are the largest Assassin Bugs in North America.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination