From the monthly archives: "November 2014"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Red bug aggregation
Location: Lake Chapala, Mexico
November 8, 2014 10:12 am
I was hiking in the Sierra Travesaño north of Lake Chapala last spring. It was near the end of the dry season and there were many individuals and small aggregations of these red bugs along the trail (oak forest at about 6,000 ft). Do you know what they are?
Signature: J. Cross

Immature Red Bug Aggregation

Immature Red Bug Aggregation

Dear J. Cross,
We are not certain if you called these Red Bugs because of the color or if you actually realized that they are in the Red Bug family Pyrrhocoridae.  They appear to be immature nymphs, and immature specimens can be very difficult to identify conclusively.

Thanks for your quick reply. They looked a bit like aggregations of boxelder and red shoulder bugs from back East, but enough different that I wasn’t certain. I was pretty sure they were hemipterans, but I didn’t know there was a Red Bug family.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Caterpillar ID
Location: Celaya, Guanajuato, Mexico
November 7, 2014 5:56 pm
Hi,
I took this picture today in Celaya, Guanajuato, Mexico. Here it is November 7th. The temperature is around 70 degrees even though it is winter here. I have close to 40 or more of these caterpillars on a climbing vine in my backyard. I have noticed orange moths or butterflies around them once or twice. Any idea what they could be? I have no intention of getting rid of them but want to know if I should keep children away from them.
Signature: Maria V.

Brush-Footed Butterfly Caterpillars

Juno Longwing Caterpillars

Dear Maria V.,
We feel confident that these are Brush-Footed Butterfly Caterpillars from the family Nymphalidae, but we are not certain of the species.  Are you able to provide us with the name of the vine they are feeding upon?  Often knowing the food plant is an excellent way to search for the identity of an insect that is feeding.  Meanwhile, we will attempt to contact Keith Wolfe to see if he recognizes these caterpillars.  We do not believe they pose any threat to your children, though the spines may be prickly.

Brush-Footed Butterfly Caterpillars

Juno Longwing Caterpillars

I managed to get an ID from a local butterfly expert about 45 minutes ago.  They are Dione Juno caterpillars and they are feeding on a Passion flower vine.  Completely harmless.  I am excitedly watching them and hope to have butterflies in about 20 days.  You guys are awesome and let me know if you want any insects in this area tracked down, photographed, or any other way I can help. I will totally be donating!!
Thanks for all the awesome work you do 🙂
Maria

Thanks for letting us know.  Them being Longwings in the tribe Heliconiini makes sense because we thought they looked similar to Gulf Fritillary Caterpillars, a related species.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Pooped a worm?
Location: Hartland , WI
November 5, 2014 1:52 pm
My husband sent this text to me and I’m waiting for a return call from the doctor. Any idea?
Signature: Freaking out

Centipede in toilet

Soil Centipede in toilet

Dear Freaking out,
Though we have been spared the text from your husband, we are deducing by your subject line that this Soil Centipede was passed during a bowel movement.  Please refer to our extensive posting entitled Can Centipedes really Crawl up your Butt???
  We would be eager to hear what the doctor has to say.

His text was basically he was freaking out because he just pooped that out. The doctor said since it was floating in the water and not mixed in the stool, it couldn’t have come from him, must’ve already been in the toilet.
He has still been having pretty intense stomach pains that come and go. He does see his regular MD for a physical on Tuesday.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: unidentified larvale!
Location: 42 North 15 East Italy
November 7, 2014 1:22 am
Hello, I live in Italy an yesterday we found this on the farm, nobody had ever seen one. Here it’s autumn, the weather is mild and damp. The bug was found about 30km from the coast, 120m above sea level, latitude 42 N longditude 15 east. What could it be?
Thanks.
Signature: Caroline

Death's Head Hawkmoth Caterpillar

Death’s Head Hawkmoth Caterpillar

Hi Caroline,
This is the caterpillar of a Death’s Head Hawkmoth,
Acherontia atropos, a wide ranging species found throughout much of Europe, the Mediterranean region and down to the tip of South Africa.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Four legged bug
Location: Southeast Michigan, 30m northwest of Detroit .
November 7, 2014 7:23 am
Found this interesting fellow in the living room yesterday. Slow moving, but very attentive-turned around and checked me out when I was examining him. Happily climbed on the edge of my phone and took a ride outside to a small pile of fallen leaves. Thanks in advance.
Signature: TM

Our Automated Response:  Thank you for submitting your identification request.
Please understand that we have a very small staff that does this as a labor of love. We cannot answer all submissions (not by a long shot). But we’ll do the best we can!

Bugman,
No problem, I’m a patient guy.
Thanks for the response. Did some other research before asking, close as I can tell it may be a leaf footed bug, but appears to have lost the back legs, so hard to tell.
While I was sending you the photos a centipede came tooling across the carpet at me.  Another successful catch and release to the front porch.
TM

Western Conifer Seed Bug missing hind legs

Western Conifer Seed Bug missing hind legs

Dear TM,
This is a Western Conifer Seed Bug, indeed one of the Leaf Footed Bugs, and you are correct that it is missing its distinctive hind legs.  Western Conifer Seed Bugs often enter homes when the weather cools to hibernate, passing the winter in relative comfort.  They will not harm your home or belongings.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unknown Beetle
Location: Maryland
November 6, 2014 3:18 pm
Hello, I was wondering if you could tell me what type of Beetle this is. It was photographed in a garage in November.
Signature: Jeremy

Cockroach

Cockroach

Dear Jeremy,
This is a Cockroach, most likely an immature nymph, but we would not rule out that it might be a wingless, adult female Cockroach.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination