What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug in babies belly button
Location: Philadelphia, PA
November 3, 2014 8:25 am
Dear Mr. Bugman,
I was changing my 13month old sons diaper today when I noticed something in his belly button. When I got a Q-Tip to clean it out I saw that it was some sort of bug. As you could imagine I was freaked out and have been trying to research what types of bug it is so I know what I need to do to get rid of these bug so he does not get bites ect…. I saw online pictures of carpet beetle but they looked hairy so I am lost. Any tips would be great since I am just so freaked out.
Thanks in advance to your attention to this matter!
Signature: Concerned Mom -Megan B (Ed. Note:  name withheld out of discretion)

Carpet Beetle Larva

Carpet Beetle Larva

Dear Megan,
We have edited your surname out of discretion and to prevent any future trauma this posting might have caused to you or your son had you been easily identified.  This looks like the larva of a Carpet Beetle, a harmless household pest that feeds on organic substances in the home, including pet hair, though we have never heard of navel lint being a source of food.

 

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination
Location: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

One Response to Carpet Beetle Larva in baby’s navel

  1. Pearl says:

    I have carpet beetles in my house. Though they do not bite they are incredible destructive to favorite cashmere sweaters… And, some of us happen to be terribly allergic. When I woke one morning with about 10 PAINFUL, burning, itching red welts I panicked, thinking I might have bed bugs. After several, late night, repeat attacks, the loss of multiple beloved wool and cashmere items from around the house, an extensive home recon mission and hours of on-line research, I have finally identified carpet beetles. As I do not wish to live in a den of conventional toxic “residual” insecticide, I have become an OCD cleaning machine and my house reeks of rubbing alcohol and essential oils. Apparently, this obsessive process of heat and natural (or less toxic to humans) insecticide will need to be repeated regularly for months as the eggs are rugged and cannot easily be killed until they hatch.

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