From the monthly archives: "October 2014"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is This Thing?
Location: Michigan
October 4, 2014 8:47 am
Found in Michigan, autumn weather.
Signature: JPF

Tailless Whipscorpion allegedly found in Michigan

HOAX:  Tailless Whipscorpion allegedly found in Michigan

Dear JPF,
We would like additional information.  Did you find this creature?  Was the photograph taken by you?  If the photograph was not taken by you, from where did it come?  We are inquiring because we believe this image is part of a hoax, though it is not entirely impossible that a Tailless Whipscorpion in the order Amblypygi might have been found in Michigan since global travel is now quite routine and this Tailless Whipscorpion might have stowed away in a suitcase.  According to BugGuide, Tailless Whipscorpions have only been reported from Arizona, Texas and Florida in North America, though we imagine they might also be found in other southern states.
  Tailless Whipscorpions are found throughout Central and South America and they are also found in warm, Old World countries.

It’s a hoax.  My neighbor said they found it, but I found the exact same image online associate with a “cave spider”.

Thanks for the confirmation that you have been “Hoaxed” by your neighbor.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Information on a Caterpillar
Location: Ojochal de Osa, Puntarenas, Costa Rica
October 2, 2014 3:35 pm
Hello,
I am interested in knowing more about this beautiful caterpillar.
Thank you,
Signature: Anna

Tetrio Sphinx Caterpillar

Tetrio Sphinx Caterpillar

Dear Anna,
This is the caterpillar of a Tetrio Sphinx, a species found in much of Central and South America.

Thank you so much for your reply.  You might smile to know that it was under my Frangipani tree 🙂

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Pandora Sphinx Moth in PA?
Location: Stroudsburg, Pennsylvania
October 2, 2014 8:07 am
Hey, guys. I just read your article on the two species, and I’m not 100% sure whether this is a Lime Hawkmoth or a Pandora Sphinx. I noticed him clinging to a stone wall on my walk home from work a couple of weeks ago, thought he was very beautiful, and snapped a picture for my photography portfolio. I’ve never seen a moth like this around here before. I live out in the Poconos in Pennsylvania.
Signature: Sierra Stashek

Pandorus Sphinx

Pandorus Sphinx

Hi Sierra,
Your moth is definitely a Pandorus Sphinx, and not a Lime Hawkmoth which is a European species.  We reported on an isolated incident of a Lime Hawkmoth in Pennsylvania several years ago, but to the best of our knowledge, the species is not established in North America.
  We recently posted an image of the Caterpillar of a Pandorus Sphinx.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this?
Location: PA
October 1, 2014 2:52 pm
What kind of caterpillar is this? Will it turn into a butterfly or moth?
Signature: Yuck!

Pandorus Sphinx Caterpillar

Pandorus Sphinx Caterpillar

Dear Yuck!,
This is the caterpillar of a Pandorus Sphinx and it will soon dig earth to pupate.  It will emerge as a beautiful green Pandorus Sphinx.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: caterpillar
Location: Gamba, Gabon
October 1, 2014 5:58 am
Found crawling among leaf debris in back garden. About 3.5 inches long, though can stretch longer.
Signature: dkortephoto

Saturniid Caterpillar

Cabbage Emperor Moth Caterpillar

Dear dkortephoto,
Your images are beautiful, as is this Caterpillar.  The only information we can provide at this time is a family, and your caterpillar belongs to the family Saturniidae, the Giant Silkmoths.  We have contacted Bill Oehlke for assistance as he has especial interest in the Saturniidae.  We hope you will permit him to post your images to his comprehensive website if he assists in the identification.

Saturniid Caterpillar

Cabbage Emperor Moth Caterpillar

Update:  October 3, 2014
We heard back from Bill Oehlke who identified this marvelous caterpillar as
Bunaea alcinoe, a species represented in our archives.  The more typical coloration we see is black with yellow and red spikes.  Your red individual is not as common a color variation.  This species is known as the Cabbage Emperor Moth Caterpillar.

Saturniid Caterpillar

Cabbage Emperor Moth Caterpillar

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: green/pink horned caterpillar
Location: Eastern Iowa
September 30, 2014 9:06 am
This guy was found outside in the grass by a chold at the daycare I work at. He is pinkish with a green underbelly and a little horn on his abdomen. He is about two inches long. We were unable to find online what type he is and would like to know to care for him as we’d like to keep him in the classroom. Thanks!
Signature: Celie B

Waved Sphinx Caterpillar

Waved Sphinx Caterpillar

Dear Celie,
This is a Waved Sphinx Caterpillar,
Ceratomia undulosa, and according to the Sphingidae of the Americas site:  “Just prior to pupation, larvae frequently take on a rosy hue.”  That means your caterpillar is probably ready to burrow beneath the soil to metamorphose into a pupa.  Provide your caterpillar with a small aquarium with several inches of moist, but not wet, dirt.  Potting soil without additives should work nicely.  Keep the terrarium cool, at approximately the same temperature as the outdoors.  You should expect eclosion, or emergence of the adult in the spring.  Keeping the terrarium at room temperature will most likely result in early eclosion, during the winter, and the individual will not be able to survive outdoors, nor will it find a mate.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination