From the monthly archives: "September 2014"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unknown Creepy Crawlers
Location: Lasqueti Island, South-West BC
September 22, 2014 5:00 pm
Found a couple neat caterpillars on a calla lilly. Nobody that I’ve asked has ever seen one like them. Do you know what they are?
Signature: -N

Tiger Moth Caterpillars: Lophocampa maculata

Spotted Tussock Moth Caterpillars: Lophocampa maculata

Dear N,
This is a Tiger Moth Caterpillar and it is apparently an uncommon color variation.  We located a matching image on BugGuide with this comment:  “It looks like a rare color variant of
L. maculata.”  Another similar looking variation is also pictured on BugGuide.  The more typical coloration on the Spotted Tussock Moth Caterpillar is black and orange.

Tiger Moth Caterpillar

Spotted Tussock Moth Caterpillar

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s this bug?
Location: New York
September 21, 2014 4:48 pm
I’ve never seen a bug like this. I’m sure you have. The legs were clear, which I thought was odd. I am in upstate New York and he was just hanging out on my friend’s table.
Signature: Ivy

Handsome Trig

Handsome Trig

Hi Ivy,
Your submission is the third posting we have created in two days of a Handsome Trig, and your images are by far the best.

Handsome Trig

Handsome Trig

Oh super! He was lovely.
Thank you so much for your help.
Ivy

She is lovely.  What appears to be a stinger is actually the ovipositor used by the female to lay eggs.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Insect identification
Location: Warren County, NJ
September 21, 2014 4:11 pm
Hey Bugman,
I saw this interesting character on my front window in western New Jersey.
I’m curious as to what it is.
Thanks!
Signature: Jojo

Giant Crane Fly

Giant Crane Fly

Hi Jojo,
We posted another image of a Giant Crane Fly earlier today.  Giant Crane Flies are attracted to lights.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Not quite an earwig, not really a cricket!
Location: Morristown, NJ
September 21, 2014 1:05 pm
I found this interesting bug at 3:30 in the afternoon in the shade of my back door – it was crawling on the door jam near the door knob.
It’s head and top of bodice was red, the bottom section black and it’s six legs are a tan/brown color. Most notably, it has one stinger-like appendage on the back, not pincers, pointing down, and it’s antennae are rounded at the top – not straight like an earwig’s. Not sure if this is a bug that eats wood or could do damage to my home, or sting me for that matter.
Signature: Julie

Handsome Trig

Handsome Trig

Hi Julie,
This Red Headed Bush Cricket,
Phyllopalpus pulchellus, is also called a Handsome Trig.  The stinger is the ovipositor, the organ used by the female to lay eggs.  Handsome Trigs feed on leaves and they will not damage your home nor will they sting you.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: yellow european moth
Location: Centre/East of Sardinia, Italy
September 21, 2014 4:04 pm
Hi there bugman, my name’s Rossana, location Sardinia, East side, not in the coast but rather to thr centre of it.
Here is the moth I couldn’t identify through google. It is not, in my opinion, a leopard moth, since it is yellow rather than white. So who can it be?
Please let me know!
Btw, it was nice to find your site again after more than ten years! Congratulations, as it’s beautiful
Kind regards
Rossana
Signature: Rossana

Tiger Moth

Tiger Moth

Hi Rossana,
Common names can create some confusion as often the same name is given to more than one species, and sometimes one species can have more than one common name.  The scientific binomial system is much more accurate, and it eliminates confusion when one species has a range that extends across countries that speak different languages.  We suspect the Leopard Moth you mentioned is
Zeuzera pyrinaYour moth is a Tiger Moth in the subfamily Arctiinae, and we believe it might be Chelis maculosa which is pictured on Hants Moths.  Additional images can be found on Moths and Butterflies of Europe and North Africa.  Another possibility is Cymbalophora pudica which can also be viewed on the Moths and Butterflies of Europe and North Africa.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Fly on calico asters
Location: Kent County, Michigan USA
September 21, 2014 3:57 pm
What is the name of this cool fly I found enjoying calico asters in Michigan in late September? Thanks!
Signature: Patricia

Tachinid Fly

Tachinid Fly

Dear Patricia,
This is a Tachinid Fly in the family Tachinidae, but we are not certain of the species.  Tachinid Flies are parasitic on other insects and arthropods.  According to BugGuide:  “Larval stages are parasitoids of other arthropods; hosts include members of 11 insect orders, centipedes, spiders, and scorpions. Some tachinids are very host-specific, others parasitize a wide variety of hosts. The most common hosts are caterpillars. Most tachinids deposit their eggs directly on the body of their host, and it is not uncommon to see caterpillars with several tachinid eggs on them. Upon hatching the larva usually burrows into its host and feeds internally. Full-grown larva leaves the host and pupates nearby. Some tachinids lay their eggs on foliage; the larvae are flattened and are called planidia; they remain on the foliage until they find a suitable host.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination