From the monthly archives: "September 2014"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: glowworm?
Location: Missouri, USA
September 27, 2014 3:09 pm
I’m not quite sure on this one, I’m thinking it’s either a glowworm or a trilobite beetle? there’s a bit of pinkish coloring on the underside and its slow moving and calm. not too large or anything
Signature: Stolz

Firefly Larva

Firefly Larva

Dear Stolz,
Glowworms are larvae and larviform females of beetles in the family Phengodidae, and coincidentally, we just finished posting an image of a Glowworm.  Your individual is a Firefly Larva in the family Lampyridae, and though both families are known for Bioluminescence, they are distinct families, even though we have categorized them together on our site.  You can compare your image of a Firefly larva to images posted to BugGuide.

Firefly Larva

Firefly Larva

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Centipede Looking Creature
Location: Raleigh NC
September 27, 2014 11:02 am
I was out in my back yard walking around and I saw this bug crawling along on the ground. I pulled out my phone and took some pictures. Could you tell me what I saw?
Signature: Joe S.

Glowworm

Glowworm

Dear Joe,
If you had the ability to darken the surroundings, you would have had a nice surprise because this is a Glowworm or Railroad Worm.  They are bioluminescent, hence they glow at night.  Your individual is in the genus
Phenogodes, and you can get additional information on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Large bee in North bay northern Ontario.
Location: Calendor northern Ontario
September 28, 2014 4:31 am
We noticed lots of bees on this particular fall day. Cannot seem to find any similar to identify.
Signature: Carol S Amour

Syrphid Fly, we believe

Syrphid Fly, we believe

Dear Carol,
This is not a bee.  If you inspect the image closely, you will see only one pair of wings, indicating that this is a fly, albeit one that mimics bees.  We believe your fly is in the family Syrphidae, the Hover Flies and Flower Flies, and many members in the family mimic bees and wasps as a means of protection.
  Though we have not had any luck locating an exact match, we believe your individual most closely resembles the members of the subgenus Eoseristalis that are pictured on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s this moth?
Location: East Hartford, ct
September 26, 2014 12:12 pm
I tried to find it. Help!
Signature: Entomolnot

Tolype

Tolype

Dear Entomolnot,
Your moth is a Lappet Moth in the genus
Tolype.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Catapillar identification
Location: Rochdale-manchester-England
September 27, 2014 6:09 am
At home I have at least half a dozen catapillars and am feeding them apple at the moment but I am unsure of the species that the catapillar is;consequent not being able to feed them ther favourite food.if you can reply as soon as that would be fantastic so I can understand what to feed them 🙂 also the catapillar has an orange tail and blue body with a black and orange head ,it also has random black spots speckled over its body
Signature: Alex:L

Gooseberry Sawfly Larva

Willow Sawfly Larva

Dear Alex:L,
Though it looks like a caterpillar, this is not a caterpillar, but rather a Sawfly Larva.  We believe we may have correctly identified it as a Gooseberry Sawfly Larva,
Nematus ribesii, thanks to this image on FlickR.  According to DownGardenServices:  “The caterpillar-like larva is light green with black dots and a shiny, black head. If disturbed it clings to the edge of the leaf while bending into a S-shape. All of the leaves can disappear with only the stalks and a few veins remaining. Check any leaves beyond them and the larvae will be there, so they can be rubbed off.  The lack of foliage weakens the bush and it produces a very poor crop the following year.”  An even closer match is the Willow Sawfly, , which is pictured on PBase and Wikimedia Commons.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Butterfly, Moth or Bug?
Location: Somdet, Thailand
September 27, 2014 2:34 am
Just got this from my wife. It looks like a moth with crying children on its wings then when it opens its wings it appears to have a yellow praying mantis on it.
Signature: Mat Coleman

Owlet Moth: Eudocima hypermnestra

Owlet Moth: Eudocima hypermnestra

Hi Mat,
Your insect is a moth, and we quickly identified it as
Eudocima hypermnestra thanks to an image on FlickR.  We located a second image on FlickR and then a posting on iNaturalist to verify the identification. 

Owlet Moth: Eudocima hypermnestra

Owlet Moth: Eudocima hypermnestra

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination