From the monthly archives: "September 2014"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Giant Swallowtail?
Location: Coryell County, Texas
August 31, 2014 9:18 pm
Hello,
This gorgeous creature visited our Vincas while we were gardening today. Is it a Giant Swallowtail, Papilio cresphontes? Today was hot and sunny, mid 90’s.
Thank you!
Signature: Ellen

Giant Swallowtail

Giant Swallowtail

Hi Ellen,
You are correct that this is a Giant Swallowtail, and we see that you also submitted some images of a Giant Swallowtail in spring 2013.  About seven years ago, we started to notice Giant Swallowtails nectaring on lantana in our garden.  We planted some citrus trees around that time, and this year we have noticed a Giant Swallowtail very interested in the Grapfruit Tree, so we expect if we searched carefully, we might locate some Orange Dogs.

Giant Swallowtail

Giant Swallowtail

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Mothra
Location: South Carolina
August 31, 2014 6:39 pm
I saw this bug in South Carolina. I didn’t think it was real until I saw it move. Is this a type of moth? What is it?
Signature: Nikon

Tersa Sphinx

Tersa Sphinx

Dear Nikon,
Your moth is a Tersa Sphinx.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: So unusual
Location: Central PA
August 30, 2014 11:04 am
I have never seen this before but such unusual color and pattern. Quite lovely.
Taken 8-29-14 in Central, PA not far from a lake in early afternoon.
It was about 3 inches long.
Signature: Abby

Hooded Owlet Caterpillar

Hooded Owlet Moth Caterpillar

Dear Abby,
This is a Hooded Owlet Moth Caterpillar in the genus
Cucullia, and after browsing through the species represented on BugGuide, we believe the closest match is to Cucullia omissa, which according to BugGuide goes by the common names Omitted Cucullia or Alberta Falconer.  This image from BugGuide depicts an individual with coloration that matches the Hooded Owlet Moth Caterpillars in your image, though other examples indicate the coloration of the caterpillar may be variable.  Another strong possibility is the Gray Hooded Owlet, Cucullia florea, and there are several images on BugGuide with a similar color pattern including this one from Maine and this one from New Hampshire.  It might even be a Goldenrod Hooded Owlet, Cucullia asteroides, based on the coloration of this individual from BugGuide.  There are also some individuals pictured on BugGuide that look like your caterpillars that are not identified to the species level.  The genus as a whole is described on BugGuide as:  “Adult: mostly drab gray moths with some fine black streaking; forewing long and narrow; tuft of hairs projecting from thorax forms a large pointed hood over the head, giving adults a streamlined “aerodynamic” appearance (a distinctive feature).  Larva: usually smooth (hairless) and very colorful, with mixed patterns of spots, stripes, and/or patches of mostly yellow, red, green, blue, and black – the range of variation between species is too complex to describe in general terms.”  BugGuide also notes:  “larvae feed on flowers of composite plants (family Asteraceae) and leaves of several trees – varies according to species,” and the individuals in your images appear to be feeding on a plant in the Asteraceae family.  Hooded Owlet Moth Caterpillars are among the most beautiful caterpillars we have represented on our site, and for that reason we have selected your submission as our Bug of the Month for September 2014.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination