From the monthly archives: "September 2014"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Whats this
Location: Warwickshire England
September 2, 2014 2:53 am
I found a bug in my home and have never seen this before , please can you identify it it was found in rugby Warwickshire ,on 31st of August 2015
Thanks in advance
J Powell
Signature: J Powell

Rove Beetle

Rove Beetle

Dear J Powell,
Wow, is Warwickshire a portal to the future???  Found in 2015???  This is a beneficial Rove Beetle in the family Staphylinidae, but we are uncertain of the species.  According to BNHS YounGnats:  “There are over 1100 different rove beetles in UK.”  According to the Empire Pest Control site:  “This casual intruder is associated with the forest environment for the whole of it’s life, however they do enter homes seeking shelter. Common in UK around field and forestry areas. Are not known for feeding on regular household food stuffs. Despite their somewhat aggresive appearance they pose no threat to people.”  The description continues with:  “What this predator is really looking for are insects, small invertebrates. It also catches maggots and other insect larvae. Will also feed on old decaying forest mushrooms and escaping sap on tree trunks.”
  We don’t really want to know why your individual appears bent into an unnatural position, though we suspect Unnecessary Carnage.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: moth ct
Location: connecticut
September 1, 2014 6:45 pm
just wondering what this is
Signature: diane

Geometrid Moth

Geometrid Moth

Hi Diane,
This pretty moth is in the family Geometridae and the larvae are known as Inchworms or Spanworms.  We wish the image was higher resolution.  We might not have the time to pursue a species identification at this time.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Dragonfly?
Location: South Carolina
August 31, 2014 6:44 pm
I have never seen this bug before. Is it some kind of dragonfly?
Signature: Nikon

Antlion

Antlion

Dear Nikon,
You are not the first person who has written to us mistaking an Antlion for a Dragonfly.  In our minds, the greatest similarity they possess is the way the wings move, but not the way the wings are held.  The wings of both orders, Neuroptera and Odonata, are able to move independently of one another.
  Of Neuroptera, BugGuide states:  “Four membranous wings: FW and HW about same size or HW a little wider at base;  wings usually held rooflike over body at rest; wings generally with many veins.”  Of Dragonflies in the suborder Anisoptera of the order Odonata, BugGuide states:  “Wings usually held outstretched horizontally at rest. Hindwing is broader at base than the forewing. Male has three terminal appendages on abdomen; female has only two.  Males and females often colored differently. Details important to identification include face color, eye color, color and markings on the thorax and wings, color of the pterostigma (small colored area near the front edge of the wing), color and markings of the abdomen and shape of the abdomen. Recently emerged (teneral) individuals are often pale, unmarked, and impossible to identify until they develop the adult color pattern. Some change color several times on the way to sexual maturity (within a few days); some change color with temperature, and some also change color after death.”  Additional differences include the complexity of metamorphosis.  Dragonflies have incomplete metamorphosis with aquatic nymphs known as Naiads.  Antlions have complete metamorphosis which includes a dormant pupa, and the terrestrial larvae are known as Doodlebugs.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Large wood boring bug with oviduct
Location: Syracuse in
September 1, 2014 12:19 pm
We found this large black an yellow striped winged bug with oviduct …any thoughts
Signature: Mary b

Pigeon Horntail

Pigeon Horntail

Hi Mary,
This is a Pigeon Horntail, a species of Wood Wasp.  The egg laying organ is an ovipositor.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: annual cicada
Location: southern ontario, canada
September 1, 2014 12:23 pm
I have used your site a number of times to identify different bugs I’ve found. As I came across it again while looking for details about an annual cicada I recently got some photos of, I thought I might see if you would like some of those photos.
They are yours to use on your site if you’d like.
Thanks for the info,
Jeff Epp

Cicada

Cicada

Hi Jeff,
Your images are beautiful.  This does not look like one of the Cicadas in the genus
Tibicen, which are quite common, so we will try to provide a genus at a later point.  You should handle Cicadas with caution.  We tried to locate a comment we received from a reader once who was handling a Cicada when the Cicada plunged its piercing proboscis into the person’s finger.  It was allegedly quite painful.  We just located the comment which states:  “A few years ago, while working in a state park nature center in Indiana, a young (6 years old) entomologist brought his latest aquisition, a cicada, to show me. I picked it up and let it crawl on my thumb. When I was ready to give it back, the thing wouldn’t let go, and decided to press that sucking mouth part into my thumb. It was pretty painful. They can DEFINATELY bite (or perhaps STAB is a more appropriate term).”

Cicada

Cicada

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Nymph Phymateus viridipes?
Location: Kitgum, Uganda
August 31, 2014 8:52 pm
Hello! My mom recently traveled to Uganda (August 2014) and took some photographs of some really neat large grasshoppers. They was photographed in Kitgum, Uganda. I think they may be nymph Phymateus viridipes? Do you agree?
Signature: Hannah

Milkweed Grasshoppers

Green Milkweed Locust

Hi Hannah,
We agree with your identification of
Phymateus viridipes, the Green Milkweed Locust, one of the Toxic Milkweed Grasshoppers in the family Pyrgomorphidae.  You can compare your image to the ones on iSpot.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination