From the monthly archives: "September 2014"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Strange Stick Insect
Location: Beagle Bay, WA, Austalia
September 3, 2014 3:19 am
Hi What’s That Bug Team,
I found this stick insect around the Kimberley Region of Western Australia, in Beagle Bay Primary School. I was hoping you could identify the species for me as some of its features and adaptations are quite foreign to me. If you’re able to identify it for me I’d be very grateful if you could get back to me.
Kind Regards
Signature: Kaleb

Stick Insect

Stick Insect

We believe you may have a new species here Kaleb.  Perhaps one of our readers can provide an identification.  It appears to be mimicking Eucalyptus or gum trees.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Giant Leopard Moth Caterpillar?
Location: Coryell County, TX
September 2, 2014 10:47 am
Hello again,
I’ve seen several of these caterpillars this summer. This one fell onto the sidewalk when I moved our garden-hose reel last night. It uncurled after a few minutes and moved off into the garden. I was unable to get a good photo of its face. I thought it was wet, but I think the bristles are just very shiny. Fascinating and really beautiful.
I think the chrysalis husk on the front porch is from the same type of caterpillar, perhaps.
Last year you kindly identified an adult Giant Leopard Moth for me. Although I haven’t seen any moths this year, could these be the caterpillars and perhaps an empty chrysalis of the moth?
Thank you so much.
Signature: Ellen

Woolly Bear: Giant Leopard Moth Caterpillar

Woolly Bear: Giant Leopard Moth Caterpillar

Hi Ellen,
You are correct.  This is the Caterpillar of a Giant Leopard Moth,
Hypercompe scribonia.  Tiger Moth Caterpillars that have this generally appearance covered with hairs are called Woolly Bears.  According to BugGuide:  “The caterpillar is mostly black with tufts of stiff black hairs of equal length radiating around its body. Rolls up head to tail when disturbed. When curled, red intersegmental rings are visible between the hairs. Spiracles are orange or red. Early instars also have the hairy tufts, but are colored dark brown and orange.”  BugGuide also states:  “Spends the winter as a caterpillar (Caterpillars of Eastern Forests(2) says it overwinters August to May – presumably this varies by location). One generation per year in the north; sometimes two generations in the south.”

Woolly Bear

Woolly Bear

Woolly Bears incorporate the hairs into the spinning of the cocoon that holds the pupa.  Chrysalis is a term that is reserved for the pupa of a butterfly.  The Giant Leopard Moth is also known as the Eyed Tiger Moth.

Cocoon of an emerged Giant Leopard Moth.

Cocoon of an emerged Giant Leopard Moth.

Subject: Possible Giant Leopard Moth Caterpillar, Part II
Location: Coryell County, Texas
September 2, 2014 8:59 pm
Hello,
I turned on the porch light tonight at 10 PM Central Standard Time, and there was the possible Giant Leopard Moth caterpillar again, stretched out on the porch’s concrete. The caterpillar started moving quickly away from the light. I had no idea they could move so fast! It crawled onto the garden soil, stopped, and crawled back onto the concrete, halting when it reached a more shadowed spot. Then it stayed perfectly still, front slightly raised. It was over two inches long when it was moving.
Here are a few more photos of the caterpillar and the empty chrysalis shell.
Thank you, and take care!
Signature: Ellen

Empty Cocoon of a Giant Leopard Moth

Empty Cocoon of a Giant Leopard Moth

Thanks for the additional images Ellen.

 

 

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: strange black white yellow caterpillars are invading my yard
Location: south eastern Arizona
August 31, 2014 10:11 pm
This is the second year my yard has literally been taken over by hundreds of caterpillars so many that when you step out side onto my porch it sounds like it’s raining due to the unbelievable amount of caterpillars.normally I wouldn’t worry but within the last two years I’ve been trying to find our exactly what kind of caterpillar thus is and if they are harmful in any way please help!
Signature: concerned/curious

Davis' Tussock Moth Caterpillar

Davis’ Tussock Moth Caterpillar

Dear concerned/curious,
This is a Davis’ Tussock Moth Caterpillar,
Halysidota davisii, which we matched to an image on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide, the range is:  “Utah, Arizona, New Mexico and northwestern Texas,” but there is no information regarding periodic outbreaks of large populations, though that is an occurence that is frequent with other species of Tussock Moths.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Brown and yellow spider
Location: United States, Northeast, Pennsylvania
August 31, 2014 12:55 pm
Hey bug friends,
Any idea what kind of spider this may be? I usually have a pretty good eye, but I couldn’t pinpoint the precise family. Both pictures were taken in a relatively urban part of south central Pennsylvania, late July.
Thanks!
Signature: Sam

Orbweaver

Orbweaver

Dear Sam,
This is an Orbweaver in the family Araneidae
, and we are uncertain if we will be able to provide you with a species identification in the limited research time we have remaining this morning.  You can try browsing through BugGuide to see if you can identify the genus and species if we are unable to provide that information.  We suspect that based on this image on BugGuide, it might be an Arabesque Spider, Neoscona arabesca, but we are not certain.  According to BugGuide, this is a wide ranging species and it has much variation in the color and markings.

Possibly Arabesque Spider

Possibly Arabesque Spider

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Beetle on a bamboo plant
Location: Singapore
September 1, 2014 6:23 am
I’ve been visited by these beetles around August. Three years ago, I snapped a photo of them mating. Just the other day, I took a picture of one laying eggs.
Could you tell me more about them?
Signature: Lee Yew Moon

Mating Leaf Footed Bugs

Mating Bamboo Coreid Bugs

Dear Lee Yew Moon,
These are not beetles.  These look like Leaf Footed Bugs in the family Coreidae to us, but we cannot provide a species name for you.  We did find a very similar looking Leaf Footed Bug from Singapore on AllExperts.

Leaf Footed Bug laying Eggs

Bamboo Coreid Bug laying Eggs

Update:  April 16, 2015
We just received a comment that these are Bamboo Coreid Bugs in the genus Notobitus.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Orange Grub in woodsy area
Location: Woods in Adirondack Mtns. near Saranac Lake, NY
September 1, 2014 9:50 am
This grub was found while camping in the woods near a pond in the Adirondacks in northern New York a few days ago. It’s color was what stood out the most. Its legs had super suction capabilities and it crawled around the ground at a very fast paced. I almost think it’s a Scarab Beetle Grub but the color doesn’t match most. We watched the grub crawl across the ground, up a dead tree stump and come down the other side. It found it’s way to an area of the ground covered in pine needles, dead leaves, twigs. It looked like it was going into some sleep mode where it began to coil into itself, covering itself with the surroundings on the ground. As time went on it looked as if it cacooned itself in a hard sticky shell covered by the leaves, twigs, and pine needles. Left before seeing what happened after. Thought it was a very interesting little bug.
Signature: Lauren

Luna Caterpillar ready to Pupate

Luna Caterpillar ready to Pupate

Hi Lauren,
This is a Luna Moth Caterpillar, and it has turned from green to orange as it is ready to pupate, a transformation that you observed.  Many people agree that the Luna Moth is one of the loveliest North American moths.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination