From the monthly archives: "September 2014"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Identification
Location: Hoghton, Lancs. UK. PR5 0JY.
September 6, 2014 8:26 am
I photographed this creature on the wall of my house, It appears to have a fixed wing cover for its flight wings. Unfortunately it disappeared in a flash as I wasn’t looking. I have checked several books but can’t see anything like it. I have from the photo calculated it’s dimensions as 30mm wingspan and
15mm. body length.
Signature: J.B. Lewis (Mr.)

Plume Moth

Plume Moth

Dear Mr. J.B. Lewis,
This is a Plume Moth in the family Pterophoridae, but we are not certain of the species.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: dragonfly
Location: Dewey Lake Prestonsburg, Kentucky
September 6, 2014 7:49 am
I recently camped at Dewey lake in eastern Kentucky and got this picture you might like.
Signature: Paul Morris

Damselfly

Damselfly

Hi Paul,
This is actually a Damselfly, and not a Dragonfly.  Both are in the same insect order Odonata, but the wings of Dragonflies lie flat while resting and the wings of Damselflies are held folded over the body.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug for ID
Location: Tiddesley Wood, Pershore, UK
September 6, 2014 9:41 am
Saw this rather beautiful ‘fly’ and wondered what it was! I have a better quality image if you would like it.
Signature: Jean Booth

Scorpionfly

Scorpionfly

Dear Jean,
Our email submission system is able to handle large digital files and we would love to get a higher resolution image of this Scorpionfly in the order Mecoptera.  We found some matching images on Olympus System Talk UK, but they are not identified to the species level.
  Bugs and Weeds identifies it as Panorpa communis, and there are some nice images on Nature Spot.  Your individual is a female.  Please send a higher quality image.

Higher Resolution image attached
Regards
Jean

Scorpionfly

Scorpionfly

Thanks Jean,
That is much better.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this
Location: Charlotte, NC
September 6, 2014 8:55 am
Found this caterpillar near my oak tree. It is as round as my thumb which is a size 8 and about 3″ long or more. The photo in Mason jar does not give it justice. I have mist grass and leaves in the jar. Small eggs are on it.
Signature: PG Forney

Hickory Horned Devil

Hickory Horned Devil

Dear PG Forney,
Had you captured a less distinctive caterpillar, attempting an identification through this distorted glass bottle probably would have been impossible, but the red horns of this Hickory Horned Devil are clearly visible.  Hickory Horned Devils ” feed on leaves of ash, burning bush, butternut, cotton, gum, hickory, lilac, pecan, persimmon, sumac, sycamore, and walnut” according to BugGuide, so unless you add some of those to the jar instead of the grass, it will surely starve unless it is preparing to pupate.  Often caterpillars leave the plants they are feeding upon when the time for metamorphosis nears.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s this bug 🙂
Location: Humansdorp, Eastern Cape, South Africa
September 4, 2014 3:06 pm
Hi there. I am keen to find out what this is, found in the Eastern cape area – Humansdorp. Thanks. Natz
Signature: Natz the big big geek

Red Insect

Red Insect

Dear Natz the big big geek,
Even though the markings on the wings of this insect are quite unusual and distinctive, there isn’t enough detail for us to determine an order to begin searching for an identification.  We are posting your image and we hope to eventually be able to provide you with some identificaton.

Hi Daniel and Natz the big big geek:
This is a Spittlebug (Family Cercopidae), Rhinaulax analis. Common names appear to include Honeycombwing Spittlebug, Red Fynbos Spittlebug, or just Fynbos Spittlebug (it also comes in a yellow form). Most online images provide a tentative identification but the Field Guide to Insects of South Africa confirms the identification (pages 154 and 155. As far as I can tell it is endemic to South Africa and is common in Fynbos vegetation. Regards. Karl

Thanks for doing all this research Karl.  We suspected it was classified in the order Hemiptera.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Mud Dauber with Araneus – Square Peg in a Round Hole!
Location: Thousand Hills State Park – Kirksville, MO
September 4, 2014 1:10 pm
Hi, Bugman!
I saw this rather interesting sight at work today. Apparently we have a Black and Yellow Mud Dauber nesting inside the hollows of our steel office door, and she has been getting in through a tiny gap above the door handle. I had seen a mud dauber hanging around the area, but didn’t realize there was one nesting there until I saw her on top of the door lever. At first I thought that she might be injured, but on closer inspection, she was trying to squeeze through the gap with a particularly rotund spider she had caught! I managed to snap some photos of the mud dauber doing some very amusing gymnastics, struggling to get the spider through the gap, before she left. Sadly, when she did give up and fly away, she did not drop the spider, which would have been helpful for identification! The most I can narrow down the spider is to the genus Araneus – which I realize, given the huge number of species under that umbrella, is like seeing an A-10 Warthog and identifying i t as ‘an aircraft of some kind.’ I was hoping you might have more luck in finding out what kind of spider our mud dauber had flown in, but, if not, then I simply hope you get a chuckle out of the photos.
Thanks!
Signature: EB

Black and Yellow Mud Dauber preys on Orbweaver

Black and Yellow Mud Dauber preys on Orbweaver

Mud Dauber tried to stuff Orbweaver in hole.

Mud Dauber tried to stuff Orbweaver in hole.

Mud Dauber kicks it with Orbweaver

Mud Dauber kicks it with Orbweaver

Dear EB,
We absolutely love your images of a Black and Yellow Mud Dauber attempting to return to its nest with this substantial Orbweaver.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination