What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: BUG ID
Location: Rochester, NY
September 7, 2014 6:14 pm
Can you ID this bug which was found in our garage. Runs fast. Possibly soldier bug ?
Thank you,
Veronica
Signature: Veronica

True Bug, but which one???

Distorted image of Toe-Biter

Dear Veronica,
We wish your image had more detail.  We are relatively confident that this is a True Bug in the suborder Heteroptera, but at this time, we cannot provide any additional information.  It most closely resembles the Narrow Stink Bugs in the genus Mecidea that are pictured on BugGuide, but we do not believe that is a correct identification, especially as there are no sightings in the northeast.  Can you please tell us how large this insect was and also send additional images if you have any.  Meanwhile, we are going to seek a second opinion from Eric Eaton.

Eric Eaton provides an obvious ID
Daniel:
Kinda funny that it *ran* fast considering this is actually an aquatic insect that *swims* fast.  LOL!  This is a giant water bug in the genus Belostoma, family Belostomatidae.  They fly well and are sometimes attracted to lights at night.  Well, you know that already, and know they are also called “toe-biters.”
Eric

Interesting Eric.  We are no strangers to Toe-Biter identifications, and at first we thought this might be a Water Scorpion.  The image appears to be distorted, and that threw us off, combined with the “runs fast” comment.

Comment
This reminds me quite a bit of a Belostomatid, but it looks like a somewhat stretched picture. If you vertically compress the picture a little bit, it’s easier to see. Then again, it could be something completely different! I look forward to hearing what Mr Eaton says. The true bugs are my favorite group to work with, there’s always surprises.
sccabrian

Dear sccabrian,
You are correct.  See Eric’s response and our reply.

Hemipteran Corrected Perspective

Hemipteran Corrected Perspective

Ed. Note:  We feel really stupid because our first thought was aquatic bug, but it just did not look right.  We never suspected altered perspective.  Of the Toe-Biters in the genus Belostoma, BugGuide states much of fascination, including “overwinters as an adult; mating and egg laying occurs in late spring or early summer” and “Females cement their eggs to the backs of males, who swim with the eggs attached, providing aeration and protection until the eggs hatch.”  This is one of the few examples in the Insect Class where the presence of the male improves the chances of survival of the young, AKA paternal behavior.  We believe the male Sexton Beetles contribute to the care of the larvae.

Thank you Daniel. Unfortunately we have no other images. We think he is about an inch long +/- a bit. I know we are horrid
describers !

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination
Location: Rochester, New York

One Response to Unknown True Bug is Toe-Biter

  1. sccabrian says:

    This reminds me quite a bit of a Belostomatid, but it looks like a somewhat stretched picture. If you vertically compress the picture a little bit, it’s easier to see. Then again, it could be something completely different! I look forward to hearing what Mr Eaton says. The true bugs are my favorite group to work with, there’s always surprises.

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