From the monthly archives: "August 2014"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: pearly looking moth
Location: Raleigh, NC
July 31, 2014 2:40 pm
Dear Bugman,
Thank you for helping me before.
I took this picture 7-27-2014 in Raleigh, NC.
It was near a Tuliptree Beauty Moth and maybe about a third the size.
Signature: aubrey

Crambid Snout Moth:  Stemorrhages costata

Crambid Snout Moth: Stemorrhages costata

Hi Aubrey,
We needed to do quite a bit of searching to identify this Crambid Snout Moth,
Stemorrhages costata, and we first found it documented on the Moth Photographers Group website where it is reported from Texas and Florida.  We cross-checked it on BugGuide where we missed it in our initial attempts at an identification.  BugGuide also lists it as being in Florida and Texas, and indicates:  “Apparently an accidental introduction from Old World tropics.”

Thank you, Daniel.
I am very excited about this ID.
How can I help you with funding?
aubrey

That is kind of you to ask Aubrey.  We have a donation button at the top of our website.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Moth
Location: Santa Rosa, New Mexico, USA
July 31, 2014 9:22 pm
Hello. I was wondering just what sort of moth this is. It’s very unusual for the usual kinds of moths we get here and i thought it was really interesting, and strong when I went to pry it off the table! But it’s safely sitting on the porch out of the rain now. Please get back to me.
Signature: Jared Serrano

Clio Tiger Moth

Clio Tiger Moth

Hi Jared,
After a bit of searching, we were able to identify this as a Clio Tiger Moth,
Ectypia clio, thanks to images posted to BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “Larvae feed on milkweed (Asclepias, Asclepiadaceae) and dogbane (Apocynum, Apocynaceae). Behr reported them on spreading dogbane (Apocynum androsaemifolium).”  We recall a recent posting with unknown caterpillars that resembled Tiger Moth Caterpillars feeding on milkweed, and now we are going to try to locate the posting to see if the caterpillars resemble the caterpillars of the Clio Tiger Moth posted to BugGuide

Clio Tiger Moth

Clio Tiger Moth

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Moth larvae group
Location: Chichen Itza, Yucatan
August 1, 2014 1:52 am
Hi
Can you identify this group of, what I guess are, moth larvae. These were in full view at the base of a tree at Chichen Itza, Yucatan, Mexico.
Many thanks
Regards
Signature: Bernard Collen

Aggregation of Ruby Spotted Swallowtail Caterpillars

Aggregation of Ruby Spotted Swallowtail Caterpillars

Good morning Bernard,
Though this is behavior that a person with some knowledge of insects might suspect would indicate that these are moth caterpillars, this is actually an aggregation of Ruby Spotted Swallowtail Caterpillars.  The Ruby Spotted Swallowtail is a lovely butterfly.  This social behavior is likely a survival strategy.

Aggregation of Ruby Spotted Swallowtail Caterpillars

Aggregation of Ruby Spotted Swallowtail Caterpillars

Thanks, Daniel, I am surprised!  I had assumed they were moth larvae.
Thanks again for your prompt reply
Best regards
Bernard

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Tropical Swallowtail Moth
Location: Singapore
July 31, 2014 10:59 pm
Hi!
Sorry that this is a couple of months late. I had the chance to take some pictures of this pretty thing some time back in June. It was resting on the other side of the glass pane right in front of me. Unfortunately, I was only equipped with my smart phone camera, so please pardon the image quality. I hope these images are useful to you; viewing a moth from its underside was very interesting.
Love the site! Images of pretty bugs inspire me in my creative endeavors. Thank you for hosting so many of them.
Signature: Fuer

Tropical Swallowtail Moth

Tropical Swallowtail Moth

Dear Fuer,
We received four other images of Tropical Swallowtail Moths this year, and your image is probably the best.  We also received numerous comments of sightings without images.  Seems it was a banner year for this species that puts in cyclical appearances.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Iowa Gall found under Honey Locust
Location: Des Moines IA
July 31, 2014 5:10 pm
This morning I found this growth on the ground below a honey locust tree. It was under a suburban tree in the Grandview park area of Des Moines with no other trees very close.
I don’t take very good pictures, but the growths appear to underlie some sort of scaled leaves, as each is covered by a tissue with a midline, and there are scale-type structures further down the stem. The stem is woody and it appears some rodent has been gnawing at the base.
It weighs about an ounce and is roughly 6″ long, with 6-10 nodules the size of marbles.
Beyond my curiosity, I’d like to know if this is something we should be concerned about controlling in the trees around where I found it.
Thank you for your time. I can try for better pictures if you need or want them.
Signature: Ash

Seed Pod, we believe

Deformed Magnolia Seed Pod

Dear Ash,
We do not believe this is a Gall.  In our opinion, it is a Seed Pod.  You observation that it was gnawed by a rodent is further evidence that perhaps a squirrel transported it from another tree.  If you open it, we believe you will find seeds beneath what you have called the “nodules the size of marbles.”

I don’t want to disagree, but it is not at all symmetrical, and I’ve been familiar with the native brush and weeds for 50+ years. It might be viral. I’ve been an outdoors-woman and hunter all my life. I’m not saying I’ve seen everything, and I am still surprised but mostly it’s been insects I overlooked or invasive species.
I have asked the state entomologist and agronomist and will let you know what they say. If it were a normal plant structure, I would anticipate more symmetry. Also squirrels are almost as opportunistic as rats.
I’ll pass on their feedback.
Thanks for your time!

Please let us know what you learn.

Update:  Deformed Magnolia Seed Pod
Please see this deformed Magnolia Seed Pod on the Missouri Botanical Garden website where it states:  “This magnolia seed pod is deformed due to poor pollination
.”

Very cool! We do have several magnolia species in the area. The scaled structure is very close. I’ll read more, but that looks like a win.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination