From the monthly archives: "July 2014"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Strange bug I’ve never seen before
Location: Southern Ca. San Fernando Valley
July 28, 2014 11:15 am
Hi I found this bug in our front lawn. It looks really creepy almost like a mix between a spider and cricket. I’m hoping you can help me out in figuring what kind if bug this is.
Signature: Creeped out

House Centipede

House Centipede

Dear Creeped out,
Most images of House Centipedes we reserve come from indoor sightings as they seem to benefit from cohabitation with humans.  A large House Centipede might bite if handled carelessly, but they are not considered dangerous.  They are beneficial as they will help to rid the area of Cockroaches and other noctural visitors that are not desirable.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Beetle in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula
Location: Marquette County, Michigan
July 28, 2014 9:16 am
Found this beetle last week on bedrock at Wetmore Pond, in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula in boreal habitat. Appears to be a longhorn or some type of sawyer?
Signature: Mike Sherman

Round Headed Apple Borer

Round Headed Apple Borer

Dear Mike,
This beautiful Longicorn is a Round Headed Apple Borer,
Saperda candida, and according to Arthur V. Evans in his new book Beetles of Eastern North America: “Larvae attack many deciduous hardwoods, including orchard and ornamental trees.”  According to BugGuide:  “Larvae feed on the wood of apples (Malus) and related trees in the rose family, such as pear (Pyrus), hawthorn (Crataegus), mountain ash (Sorbus) and Saskatoon (Amelanchier). Also: Aronia, Cotoneaster, Cydonia, Prunus” and “These insects seek out trees which are already weakened due to some other stress. A heavy infestation can kill a tree.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this bug
Location: Southern California
July 27, 2014 3:10 pm
We see this but a lot in our garden here in San Marino California., which is right next to Pasadena, CA. We would love to know what it is. Thank you!
Signature: Mirta

Large Milkweed Bug

Large Milkweed Bug

Dear Mirta,
We suspect you must have milkweed in your garden.  This is a Large Milkweed Bug,
Oncopeltus fasciatus, and it will feed on the seeds of milkweed, but otherwise does not harm the plant.  See BugGuide for more information on the Large Milkweed Bug.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Skimmer? Dragonfly?
Location:  Whitewater Preserve, Riverside County, California
July 25, 2014
dear what’s that bug?
this handsome creature posed on my car’s antenna at the wildlands conservancy’s “Whitewater Preserve” in riverside county this past weekend. could you ID him for me, please?
thank you! clare.

Flame Skimmer

Flame Skimmer

Hi Clare,
We believe that based on images posted to BugGuide, this is a male Flame Skimmer,
Libellula saturata, a species of Dragonfly.  It is described on BugGuide as:  “males bright orange with amber color in the wings covering half the width of the wing, out to the nodus, and all the way to the rear of the hind wing. Females paler but still with some amber at least on the leading edge of the wing.”

Flame Skimmer

Flame Skimmer

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: black wasp with white bands
Location: Fairfax, VA
July 27, 2014 12:27 pm
I photographed this attractive wasp (at the same time as a Great Golden Digger Wasp) on 7/27/14 in Fairfax, Virginia. I haven’t been able to find a reference to ID it. Can you help?
Signature: Seth

Four Toothed Mason Wasp

Four Toothed Mason Wasp

Dear Seth,
Your images of the Four Toothed Mason Wasp,
Monobia quadridens, are positively gorgeous.  According to BugGuide:  “Usually nests in wood borings, but sometimes burrows in dirt banks. Sometimes takes over abandoned nests of carpenter bees or ground bees, also Sceliphron (mud dauber) cells. Nest is provisioned with caterpillars, and cells of nest are separated by mud partitions.”

Four Toothed Mason Wasp

Four Toothed Mason Wasp

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug id
Location: Norther Maine
July 27, 2014 11:00 am
Just wondering what this one is. I haven’t seen it before. Looks like a cross between a cricket and a grasshopper.
Signature: Nathan

Eastern Shieldback

Introduced Shieldback

Dear Nathan,
This is an Eastern Shieldback Katydid in the genus
Atlanticus, but we are not certain of the species.  Piotr Naskrecki, a Katydid expert, often assists us with species identifications when we are stumped, but he is currently collecting in Mozambique.  We will attempt to contact him, but we may not hear back for some time.  Meanwhile, you can compare your individual, which is a female based on her curved ovipositor, to the images posted to BugGuide.  According to BugGuide, they are “Omnivorous, eat other insects (living and dead), fruits, leaves, flowers of a variety of vegetation” and “Said to be strong biters.”

Eastern Shieldback

Introduced Shieldback

Correction Courtesy of Piotr Naskrecki
Hi Daniel,
Not an Atlanticus but an invasive species from Europe, Metrioptera roeselii (still very pretty, though.) It is common across the NE US.
Cheers,
Piotr

Thanks Piotr.  According to BugGuide:  “An introduced species from Europe first found in Montreal in 1953 (1).  Both long and short-winged forms exist. The long-winged forms can fly some distance and are more commonly collected here than in Europe.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination