From the monthly archives: "June 2014"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Flat Brown Insect, maybe?!
Location: Denver, CO
June 18, 2014 8:07 pm
Hi!
I was bit in the rear end by the bug in the attached photo. I am wondering what it is and if I need to seek medical attention. Any help you could offer would be greatly appreciated. It is June 18, 2014 near Denver, CO where I was bit. Thank you!
Signature: Charity Davis

Masked Hunter

Masked Hunter

Dear Charity,
We were out of the office when you wrote and we are just trying to catch up on old mail.  This is an immature Masked Hunter, and though the bite is reported to be painful, it will not have any lasting negative effects.  Masked Hunters will prey upon Bed Bugs and other unwanted creatures in the home, and nymphs are generally masked by lint which sticks to their bodies, making the name Masked Hunter very logical.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unusual Bug
Location: Rochester, NY
June 19, 2014 11:38 am
I saw this yesterday at the Rochester Institute of Technology in Rochester, NY.
By looking online I can see that it is very similar to a Giant leopard moth, but with some significant differences.
The one I saw has black spots instead of black circles, and notice how the body protrudes behind the wings.
It is also less than 2″ long.
Any ideas?
Signature: Thanks, Doug

Leopard Moth

Leopard Moth

Dear Doug,
Though the Giant Leopard Moth, which is one of the Tiger Moths, and your Leopard Moth,
Zeuzera pyrina, look similar, they are not even closely related.  Your Leopard Moth is in the Carpenter Moth family Cossidae, and according to BugGuide:  “Unlike the Giant Leopard Moth, this one is not native to the US. Supposedly introduced (from its native Europe?) in mid-1800s; first reported in North America at Hoboken, New Jersey in 1882.  It is considered a pest of some fruit trees.”  You can compare your image to this image on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Dragonfly relative / nymph?
Location: Austin, Texas
June 19, 2014 2:21 pm
I spotted this flying insect on a purple coneflower near an area with man-made ponds and lots of dragonflies, turtles and fish. When the insect flew away, there was a buzzing sound.
Signature: Susan

Red Footed Cannibalfly

Red Footed Cannibalfly

Our automated Response:  Thank you for submitting your identification request.
Please understand that we have a very small staff that does this as a labor of love. We cannot answer all submissions (not by a long shot). But we’ll do the best we can!

Hi. I actually figured out (after much research) that the photo I submitted was of a robber fly (aka assassin fly), Asilidae…and further narrowed it down to a variety of Diogmites. I can’t seem to take it any further, as I haven’t seen any of these with abdomens as long as the one in my photo.

Hi Susan,
We were away from the office when you wrote, and we are trying to catch up on old mail, posting some of the more interesting images we received in our absence, including yours.  Your identification is only partially correct.  While this is a Robber Fly in the family Asilidae, it is not a Hanging Thief in the genus
Diogmites.  It is a Red Footed Cannibalfly, Promachus rufipes, and you can compare your excellent image to the images posted to BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: freaky bug found in northern Georgia
Location: Blue Ridge Mountains, Northern Georgia
June 19, 2014 4:43 pm
I recently took a trip up to the Blue Ridge Mountains in northern Georgia and I came across this thing sitting on my porch during a thunderstorm. I’m not worried about it being dangerous or anything, but I’ve been trying to identify it ever since I saw it, and I can’t find anything on the internet about it, so I’d be very grateful if you could help me out!
Signature: -Alyson

Male Dobsonfly

Male Dobsonfly

Dear Alyson,
We field so many identification requests for Dobsonflies like the one in your image, that we have it in out Top Ten tag along with Wheel Bugs, Toe-Biters, Potato Bugs and Eyed Elaters.
  We chuckled when we saw you named your file “hell bug” and though he looks quite fierce, this male Dobsonfly is perfectly harmless.  The much less impressive looking female Dobsonfly has smaller, but much more practical mandibles, and a bite, though harmless, has been reported to draw blood.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Who dat?
Location: Reston va
June 19, 2014 1:04 pm
My son found this odd critter on our screen. Location- Reston va
Signature: Buggin

Saddleback Caterpillar Moth

Saddleback Caterpillar Moth

Hi Buggin,
We spent many vacations in the late 1960s and early 1970s in Reston because our uncle was one of the first contractors to begin building in the model town, but we haven’t seen it since 1980, and we expect much has changed.  This is a Saddleback Caterpillar Moth as you can see from this matching image on BugGuide.  Though we have not shortage of stinging Saddleback Caterpillar images, this is the first we have posted of the adult moth.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Moth in Northeastern NJ
Location: Verona, NJ
June 16, 2014 12:03 pm
Hello … Can you identify this lovely moth? Can’t find him in my field guides.
Thanks so much!
Have a lovely vacation…
Signature: Anne

Tufted Bird Dropping Moth

Tufted Bird Dropping Moth

Hi Anne,
We did have a lovely time on holiday, but we know we will never be able to make a dent in the countless submissions that arrived in our absence.  Fortuitously, we selected your request from our backlog, and we have been obsessed with identifying this lovely moth.  We figured it was in the superfamily Noctuoidae, and we were correct.  We found
Cerma cerintha, the Tufted Bird Dropping Moth, on the Moth Photographers Group website, and we crosschecked that on BugGuide where we learned:  “larvae feed on leaves of plants in the rose family (Rosaceae) such as apple, cherry, hawthorn, peach, pear, plum, rose.”

Tufted Bird Dropping Moth

Tufted Bird Dropping Moth

Welcome back…  I hope you can make a dent in the backlog…  yikes!
Wonderful!  Thank you so much…  I do have an apple tree, and roses in my yard, and the street trees on my block are cherry…
Be well  🙂

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination