From the monthly archives: "June 2014"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What bug is this?
Location: New Jersey
June 29, 2014 8:48 pm
I saw this one crawling on the kitchen counter above my dishwasher just the other night June 26 in northern New Jersey. I haven’t been able to figure out what kind of insect this is.
Signature: Cat

Male Oak Timberworm

Male Oak Timberworm

Dear Cat,
Earlier this month, we spent a great deal of time trying to identify a male Oak Timberworm which we were relatively certain was a Weevil though it is lacking the snout normally associated with Weevils.  The earlier posting, also from New Jersey, had an image not nearly as sharp as the one you have provided.  According to BugGuide:  “Females lay eggs in living trees where sapwood exposed by injury; larvae bore into wood beneath.”

Oh thank you so much!  I was super curious.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: wasp?
Location: Anchorage
June 29, 2014 4:45 pm
This appears to be a wood wasp…. bit the extra long stinger? Wood bore tool? Should I be looking fora nest? Dangerous to me or my dogs?
Signature: cautiously fascinated in Alaska

Giant Ichneumon or Stump Stabber

Giant Ichneumon or Stump Stabber

Dear cautiously fascinated in Alaska,
This is a Giant Ichneumon or Stump Stabber in the genus
Megarhyssa, not a Wood Wasp, however, the female Stump Stabber does use her lengthy ovipositor to lay eggs beneath the surface of wood that has been infested with the boring larvae of Wood Wasps, the only food upon which the developing larva of the Giant Ichneumon will feed.  They do not build nests as they are solitary parasitoids and they do not pose a danger to you or your dogs, though we admit that any ovipositor that can penetrate wood might be able to penetrate human skin, however, these Giant Ichneumons are not aggressive toward humans. 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Black Rimmed Prominent
Location: Mancelona, MI
June 29, 2014 5:37 pm
This distinctly-patterned moth is the Black Rimmed Prominent (Pheosia rimosa). It can be found throughout North America. Evidently there’s another color morph, with a darker pattern, that was formerly considered a different species–you can see it on Bugguide. The young feed on aspen and willows. This adult showed up on a window after a warm late-June night.
Signature: Helen

Black Rimmed Prominent

Black Rimmed Prominent

Hi again Helen,
Thanks for continuing to provide moth images lacking in our archives.  According to BugGuide:  “”Caterpillar resembles young hornworm caterpillars. Color may be yellow, lavender, pink, green, brown or nearly black. Skin is very shiny. Black horn on last abdominal segment and hard red-edged anal plate.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Fly mating with dead fly?
Location: Northeast Florida
June 29, 2014 3:56 pm
I saw this fly (or these flies) today in northeast FL. I thought at first that it was a pair of mating flies and took a few photos. However, it appears that this is a live fly that had been mating with a fly that died, and it was now dragging the dead fly along with it as it walked and flew around. I’ve never seen anything like this before.
Signature: Karen in FL

Flesh Fly matings ends with death of the male!!!

Flesh Fly with dead mate

Dear Karen,
We are positively stunned by your images, which appear to have captured the mating of Flesh Flies in the family Sarcophagidae that ended with the death of one of the partners, from unknown causes.  We can assure you that Flesh Flies do not practice necrophilia, and that for some reason, the individual succumbed while in flagrante delicto, and for yet more unexplained reasons, the sexual bond was not broken after the death.  The red-tipped abdomen is a rather distinctive feature, and upon searching though images on BugGuide, we found at least three genera that have this characteristic:  
SarcophagaOxysarcodexia and Arachnidomyia.  Though they are not necrophiliacs, BugGuide does indicate that:  “Larvae: many species are necrophagous, but some feed in mammalian tissues or parasitize other arthropods (bees, cicadas, termites, grasshoppers/locusts, millipedes), earthworms, or snails(3). Adults feed on various sugar-containing materials such as nectar, sap, fruit juices and honeydew.”  Thanks for providing a very intriguing posting for our site.  Typical Flesh Fly mating should look like this.

Flesh Fly mating ends with death of a partner!!!

Flesh Fly mating ends with death of a partner!!!

Hi Daniel,
I was pretty stunned too when I realized what was going on with that fly! I assumed both flies had been alive when mating began, but I couldn’t imagine what might have killed one partner while leaving the other looking perfectly fine and healthy, except for dragging the dead partner around everywhere it went.
Karen in FL

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: ID please
Location: Roanoke, VA
June 29, 2014 2:21 pm
Hi. This moth-butterfly alit on the siding of a house. Look familiar?
Signature: denis

Luna Moth

Luna Moth

Dear Denis,
The Luna Moth is unmistakable among North American insects, and it is the only member of its genus found in North America, though relatives that look similar are found in other parts of the world, including the Moon Moth of India and 
Actias rhodopneuma from Thailand.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Beetles in Portugal
Location: Serra da Mamede, Portugal
June 29, 2014 12:39 am
Dear Daniel,
Thank you very much for the identification. At the risk of being greedy, could I also ask you to identify this lovely two tailed fly. Found near a stream in the same area, its wingspan and tails are about two and a half inches long.  What does it use these amazing tails for?
Peter Burrows

Thread-Winged Lacewing

Thread-Winged Lacewing

Hi again Peter,
This is a Thread-winged Lacewing or Ribbon Winged Lacewing,
Nemoptera bipennis.  We are not certain why the wings have evolved to have such delicate tails.

Dear Daniel,
Many thanks for this. It is wonderful to have your expertise available on the internet.
With bets wishes, Peter

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination