From the monthly archives: "May 2014"

Subject: interesting moth
Location: settled on a door step in preston lancs
May 27, 2014 1:56 pm
today i saw a moth that had markings exactly as a camoflouge i. e. same as for example a army camaflouged suit
Signature: anyway

Lyme Hawkmoth

Lime Hawkmoth

Dear anyway,
This Lime Hawkmoth,
Mimas tiliae, is a relatively common species in the UK.  You can read more about it on UK Moths.

Subject: Indiana Moth
Location: Northern Indiana
May 27, 2014 1:51 pm
I am having trouble identifying a moth that was found. Maybe you can help guide me in the right direction.
Signature: Ashlee Haviland

Small Eyed Sphinx

Small Eyed Sphinx

Hi Ashlee,
Your moth is a Small Eyed Sphinx,
Paonias myops, and your image is much clearer than the Small Eyed Sphinx image we posted yesterday.

Subject: Beetle larva and other?
Location: North East NJ
May 27, 2014 8:06 am
Hello and thank you for this site and your time. If you ever get the time to ID, this insect I would be grateful, however it is just a matter of curiosity and nothing dire so if you get around to it great and if not, thank you anyway. This picture was was taken in North East New Jersey a few days ago in May on a plant lining a pond. The larger one in the center of the photo should be some type of beetle larvae (Uneducated guess). Would you know what type of beetle it is or if I am right? The almost metallic color to it, threw me off and I don’t think it is a ladybird beetle larvae or a dermestid. (Again could be wrong.) Also when I got the pic back and looked at it, I noticed something coming out of it’s posterior. I know larvae are not sexually mature so, not to be gross, is it just pooping or is that a parasite. Lastly I also noticed the smaller red juvenile bugs also, any idea what these are?
As always with or without a response thank you for your work
Signature: Frank Smith

Groundselbush Beetle Larva

Groundselbush Beetle Larva

Hi Frank,
You are  correct about the Beetle Larva.  More specifically, it is the larva of a Groundselbush Beetle,
Trirhabda bacharidis, a species that feeds exclusively on Baccharis.  We are not certain what it is excreting, and we are not certain of their identity, but the tiny red nymphs might be immature Leafhoppers or Spittlebugs.

Thank you so much for your response, it made my day. I learned about a beetle that is new to me, so thanks again! I will follow up and see if I can find any references on what it is excreting or being parasitised by and will keep you posted if I find anything. You people are awesome!
Frank

Subject: What is she eating?
Location: Andover, NJ
May 27, 2014 12:27 pm
I was trying to get some shots of this paper wasp when I realized that it (she?) was eating or carrying something. I wasn’t able to get enough magnification in the image to determine what was in the wasps mouth, although it does look a little like a grub. The wasp eventually got tired of me taking pictures and took off with whatever it was still in its jaws. I’d be very interested in what was going on here.
Thank you!
Signature: Deborah

Paper Wasp with Prey

Paper Wasp with Prey

Hi Deborah,
It would be very difficult to identify the prey in your images conclusively, however, we can make an educated guess.  Paper Wasps in the genus
Polistes take nectar for nourishment, however, the workers do capture insects to feed to the developing larvae in the nest.  Caterpillars are a favored prey of Paper Wasps, and when they are captured, the caterpillars are often skinned and rolled into a ball for easy transportation back to the nest.  We feel strongly that the prey in your images is a Caterpillar.

Paper Wasp with Prey

Paper Wasp with Prey

Thank you!  What a fascinating thing to observe.  I thought it might be too early for them to be feeding larvae, but I guess it’s not.  Very cool.
Deborah Bifulco

 

Subject: what is this?
Location: assonet, ma
May 27, 2014 8:13 am
Found this bug on my deck and I was hoping to get info on it. Is it harmful is the main ?
Signature: idk

White Spotted Sawyer

Whitespotted Sawyer

Dear idk,
This is a Whitespotted Sawyer,
Monochamus scutellatus, one of the Longhorned Borer Beetles in the family Cerambycidae.  The white spot refers to the scuttelum, the triangular shaped area where the wings attach to the body.  According to BugGuide:  “Larvae excavates galleries in coniferous trees, often after they are damaged by a fire, storm, etc.”  That indicates they are not a threat to healthy trees nor to milled lumber.  We don’t understand what you mean by:  “Is it harmful is the main ?”

Im sorry it was a typo. What I was trying to ask, is it harmful to humans?

The mandibles are quite strong, and they might provide a painful nip and possibly even draw blood if the Whitespotted Sawyer is carelessly handled, but they do not provide a threat to humans.

Subject: unknown bug
Location: Virginia
May 27, 2014 4:39 am
So I’ve been having some trouble recently with bugs- bed bugs, spiders, even a centipede or two. However this is a new one.
I was getting ready to take a shower and noticed a black object on my breast and when I looked down I noticed a black thing attacked to my breast. Flicking didn’t get it off, so I had to grab a washrag and scrub it off. It fell into the sink and started to move around, which is when I grabbed the picture. It was small, eight legs but no pincers as far as I could tell.
It did leave a bite on the skin, not deep and it doesn’t appear to have caused any damage.
Signature: freaked out

Tick

Tick

Dear freaked out,
At the risk of adding to your anxiety, we need to inform you that you were being parasitized by a Tick.  Ticks are blood suckers, and when their preferred host is not available, many species will feed off the blood of humans.  On a positive note, you managed to dislodge this Tick relatively quickly, and there is always a danger when removing a Tick that the head will remain embedded in the skin and cause an infection.  Also, the damage caused by Ticks is often delayed.  Ticks are known vectors for many diseases, including Lyme Disease.  See the CDC website for more information on Lyme Disease.  You may have encountered this Tick while hiking in fields or woods where they lie waiting for hosts like deer, or you may have had it transferred by a pet like a cat or dog that goes outdoors.