From the monthly archives: "May 2014"

Subject: Large Beetle I have never seen before
Location: North Western Pennsylvania
May 28, 2014 6:17 am
Bugman the photos I have attached are of a large beetle that I have never encountered. Living on a farm in North western Pennsylvania we see a multitude of insects but nobody in our area has seen on of these, I am hoping you can identify it. The beetle is approx. 3 inches long and 1 1/2 inches wide. It flew into the side of our swimming pool and sounded like a baseball it hit so hard. It appears to have multiple sets of wings and looks even larger when in flight. Unfortunately its navigation error ended it’s life.
Signature: Mark

Toe-Biter

Toe-Biter

Hi Mark,
This is not a Beetle, but rather, a Giant Water Bug, commonly called a Toe-Biter.  Giant Water Bugs are aquatic predators that are capable of flying from pond to pond to swimming pool.  The bite of a Toe-Biter is reported to be quite painful, but not dangerous to humans.

Subject: Two different bugs
Location: Upstate SC
May 28, 2014 5:10 am
We went on a little hike in a nearby wetlands area and along our way we found two interesting bugs. One of them looks like a kind of wasp to me, the other one is completely new to me! I’m curious what they are, especially the one with the long stinger for a nose? Thanks for helping out!
Signature: Joyce H.

Paper Wasp

Paper Wasp

Dear Joyce,
We have already written back that you submitted images of a Bee Fly and a Paper Wasp.  We are posting your image of the Paper Wasp in the genus
Polistes.  It appears it might be chewing on that weathered wood to make paper pulp for the construction of its nest.  Paper Wasps make nests of chewed wood pulp, creating chambers for raising young.  The nest has a queen and the colony survives for a single season.  Based on its coloring and markings and its resemblance to this image on BugGuide, this might be a Northern Paper Waps, Polistes fuscatus, which despite its common name, ranges as far south as Florida.

Subject: Beetle in Pecan Tree
Location: Orlando, Florida
May 27, 2014 6:53 pm
I found this beetle in our old Pecan tree that has been on it’s down side for a few years now. There are at least 4 dozen holes around the bottom of the tree extending upwards 6-7 feet. The beetle does not like sunlight and does not like light from a bulb flashlight but is ok with an LED flashlight.
The antennas are long, 2″ or so and the pincers are black and hard. When I tapped the antenna of one with a piece of paper it went back into the hole and folded back it’s antenna then came forward with it’s pincers. When I touched the pincers with the paper it grabbed it and gave it a tug as if to take it into the hole.
Signature: Don_S

Longicorn emerges from hole in pecan tree

Longicorn emerges from hole in pecan tree

Dear Don,
We probably cannot determine an exact species based on your image, however, your detailed description indicates that this is a Longhorned Borer Beetle or Longicorn in the family Cerambycidae.  Larvae are wood borers, and often spend several years feeding on wood prior to emerging as adult, winged beetles.  Longicorns are not general feeders, and each species has a single or several preferred host plants, and most do not infest healthy trees.  Your letter indicates this tree has been in decline, and that is likely the reason that wood boring insects have begun to feed on it.  Your description and image indicates that this is an adult beetle and it should soon be exiting through the hole it bored to the surface.  Once they leave the larval burrow, they will not return, though we would not discount the possibility that a female might enter a hole to lay her eggs.  Based on knowing the host plant is a pecan tree, we will attempt an identification, but if you really want a species identification, we would suggest that you capture a beetle and provide us with a dorsal view. The Texas A&M University Entomology site’s Insect Pests Attacking Pecan in the US page lists 15 Longicorns that feed on the wood of pecan trees.

Hello Daniel,
Thank you for your reply. It was difficult to get a good picture so I’m happy the description helped.
Is there any action that we should take to eliminate the beetle before we have the tree remove?
Thank you in advance,
Don Schenck

You can leave the cut wood on site and allow the beetles to develop.

Subject: What is the name of this beautiful bug
Location: Naran valley, Pakistan
May 28, 2014 12:44 am
This is a bug, I saw in Naran Pakistan. Can you please tell me the name of this bug? I am attaching the image of the bug for your analysis. Please tell me if you identify the bug.
Thank you!
Zohaib.
Signature: For analysis

Jewel Beetle

Jewel Beetle

Dear Zohaib,
This is a Metallic Borer Beetle or Jewel Beetle in the family Buprestidae.  The larvae bore in the wood of trees and shrubs, and most species of Jewel Beetle have specific host plants rather than feeding indiscriminately.  We will attempt to identify your beetle to the species or at least genus level.

Subject: Unknown morning visitor
Location: Rhode Island
May 28, 2014 4:19 am
This bug was outside my front door on the house this morning. Any ideas what it is?
Signature: Robin G

Fishfly

Fishfly

Dear Robin,
This is a Fishfly in the genus
Chauliodes, and because of the pectinate antennae, it is a male.  Because of the season, we strongly suspect this is a Spring Fishfly, Chauliodes rastricornis, and you can learn more about it by visiting BugGuide.

Subject: cicada nymphs??
Location: Sandia Park, NM
May 27, 2014 4:40 pm
Hi,
Have seen adult cicadas all our lives-are these nymphs? They are all over our pine trees and make lots of “clicking noises” sort of like the initial cicada noises.
Thanks!
Signature: Warner family

Cicada

Cicada

Dear Warner Family,
Immature Cicadas, known as nymphs, live underground and they do not have wings.  These are adult Cicadas of some small species.  We will attempt to identify your Cicadas to the species level.

Thanks so much for getting us this far.
We really appreciate your site for all our bug-questions!

Cicada

Cicada

Cicada

Cicada