From the monthly archives: "May 2014"

Subject: Strange looking bug in ohio
Location: Mason, oh
May 1, 2014 5:28 pm
A friend was walking around in the woods in ohio and stumbled across this weird looking bug(?) it almost looks like a scorpion and frog bred. What is it?!
Signature: Jackie

Naiad, possibly Mayfly

Naiad, possibly Mayfly

Hi Jackie,
This is the aquatic nymph of a flying insect, known as a Naiad.  It might be a Mayfly Naiad, and it looks very similar to this BugGuide image.

Subject: HELP!!!!
Location: SC
May 2, 2014 5:35 am
Hi! I am finding these bugs everywhere. They are mostly around windows and are all small… No longer than half of my pinky nail. I’ve looked around at different photographs and am finding conflicting answers. TIA for your help!!
Signature: Sarah

Smoky Brown Cockroach Nymph

Smoky Brown Cockroach Nymph

Hi Sarah,
Though it is not normally listed as a species that infests homes, we have gotten numerous reports of sightings of Smoky Brown Cockroach,
Periplaneta fuliginosa, nymphs in homes, so we have begun tagging them as Household Pests.  The University of Minnesota Extension site lists the home infesting Cockroaches as:  “There are four kinds of cockroaches that can infest homes in Minnesota, including German cockroach, brownbanded cockroach, American cockroach, and Oriental cockroach. These four species can be major pests in restaurants, hospitals, warehouses, offices and buildings with food-handling areas. “  We will seek another opinion on the pest status of the Smoky Brown Cockroach.

Update to Pest Status Inquiry by Eric Eaton
Daniel:
I have no answer for this….although it is highly possible that the females deposit their egg cases (oothecae) in crevices under siding or something and then the nymphs initially find their way indoors.  That is my only theory.  I have certainly seen adults of this species crawling around the exterior of buildings.
Eric

Hi, thanks for your reply. I live in a heavy wooded area on the water so I was assuming it might be a baby waterbug as we call them in SC.

Subject: Bug attached to skin
Location: Iowa
April 30, 2014 5:56 pm
My husband found these little bugs on/under his skin, upper thighs. Any thoughts on what these little guys are? Very frustrating!
Signature: Kell

Crab Lice

Crab Lice

Dear Kell,
These sure look like Crab Lice,
Phthiris pubis, to us.  BugGuide only has a few images and very little information.  You can learn more about this human parasite on the Penn State Entomology site where it states:  “These lice are found mostly in the hair of the pubic area. They may also be found under the armpits, in the beard or mustache and on the eyebrows and eyelashes. Their development from egg to adult normally requires from 30 to 41 days. Adult crab lice live about 30 days. Females deposit 30-50 eggs (in her lifetime).”

Crab Louse

Crab Louse

 

Subject: Thousands of these tiny bugs in my garden
Location: Tempe, AZ
April 30, 2014 7:30 pm
Hello,
I have a permaculture garden in the front yard. Mostly covered in wood chips and compost.
I live in Tempe, Arizona. This evening, I saw thousands of these critters crawling among the rocks, concrete patio and among my sweet alyssum plants.
I have a lot of kale in the yard, one watermelon patch, some cucumber, zucchini, and lots of nasturtium among other edible plants.
Not sure what they are. I don’t normally bother with garden pest because I do organic gardening to avoid killing bees and pollinators.
But the shear number of these bugs scared me a little bit.
Please help me identify.
They are tiny, the largest ones I could find is about 2mm. Attached is photo of the larger one and a group of the smaller ones, that were about 1mm.
These were taken with point and shoot camera and cropped really tight to show the insects.
Signature: Yes

Immature Dirt Colored Seed Bug

Immature False Chinch Bug

A few days ago, we posted an image, also from Arizona, of a very similar immature Heteropteran that we tentatively identified as a Dirt Colored Seed Bug in the family Rhyparochromidae.  It can be very difficult to ascertain a proper identification based on an immature specimen.  Perhaps we will soon learn a proper identification if there is a statewide outbreak of these numerous nymphs.

Immature Dirt Colored Seed Bugs

Immature False Chinch Bugs

Dear Daniel,
Thank you so much for writing back.
After hours of looking through Google. I came to what is the closet to all the different stages of the bug that is in my photo.
False Chinch Bugs
http://www.ext.colostate.edu/pubs/insect/05603.html
Looks like my photos match exactly the different stages of the photo they have on the site “Figure 2. False chinch bug adults and nymphs.”
I also posted a lot more photos I took here:
http://www.phoenixpermaculture.org/forum/topics/i-have-a-huge-amount-of-crawlers-in-the-yard
What do you think?
Thank you.
Sincerely,
Jacq Davis

Hi Jacq,
We believe your False Chinch Bug identification might be correct.  Nymphs can be very difficult to properly identify.  According to BugGuide:  “3 (or more) species are introduced N. caledoniae, huttoni, vinitor” which supports our believe that this might be an invasive exotic species.

Subject: Huge crab-shell shaped spider in Ecuador’s Andes Mountains
Location: Cuenca, Azuay, Ecuador (Andes Mountains)
May 1, 2014 4:52 am
A few months ago while on a hike in the Andes we spotted a large spider hole – with this huge spider inside. The crab-shell shape was a first for us. One of our readers suggested that it’s a Ancylometes (giant fishing spider).
We have a video of the spider in the url below – and we would love to know something about it.
http://www.gringosabroad.com/red-fanged-tarantula-cuenca-ecuador/
Thanks so much!
Signature: Bryan Haines

Wolf Spider

Wolf Spider

Hi Bryan,
Based on the eye pattern (see BugGuide), we believe this is a Wolf Spider in the family Lycosidae.  Large individuals might bite, but they are not considered dangerous.  Perhaps one of our readers will be able to provide a comment with a genus or species name.

Wolf Spider

Wolf Spider

Subject: SE Texas unidentified bug
Location: 50 miles SW of Houston, TX
May 1, 2014 5:51 am
The bug in the attached picture showed up by the thousands (or more!) in the country southwest of Houston, TX. They existed for about two or three weeks and have about vanished by 05/01.
Signature: Ron

Fir Tussock Moth Caterpillar

Fir Tussock Moth Caterpillar

Hi Ron,
We have identified your Tussock Moth Caterpillar as
Orgyia detrita, and according to BugGuide, it has two common names:  Fir Tussock Moth or Live Oak Tussock Moth.  Curiously, BugGuide does not list any food plants for the caterpillar, but the common names indicate it prefers Fir or Live Oak.  BugGuide also notes that the caterpillar can be distinguished from other Tussock Moth Caterpillars in the same genus because of “The sides of the body are gray and supraspiracular warts are orange” and “Unique to this species are the orange-colored spots along the back and sides.”

Daniel, thanks for the VERY rapid response!  I have quite a few large Live Oak trees on my couple of country acres.  One almost covers my house, no wonder I have all these critters showing up.
I decided you deserve a donation that I just sent.   Keep up the good work. You will probably hear from me again.
Ron

Thanks Ron.  You are most generous.