From the monthly archives: "May 2014"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: leaf cutter bee preservation
May 31, 2014 8:19 am
Using your wonderful site, I believe I have identified a leaf cutter bee making its nest in a drainage hole  of one of my plants. I noticed her several days ago frequently visiting the hole. Now, she is diligently bringing leaves into the hole presumably to line its burrows for egg laying.
My concern is watering the plant-I’m afraid I will “drown” the offspring/eggs. Should I seal the hole when I know the bee is gone to encourage it to go elsewhere or will the eggs survive waterings?
She is proividing me with hours of entertainment but I don’t want to destroy her eggs.
Signature: Maary Beth

Leaf Cutter Bee (image from our archives)

Leaf Cutter Bee (image from our archives)

Dear Maary Beth,
We believe the Leaf Cutter Bee in question scouted for the perfect location for her nest, and your potted plant is ideal because of the moisture level.  As you can see from this image from our archives, Leaf Cutter Bees occasionally build nests in potted plants.

Thank you for your response. I am relieved to know we can happily cohabitate. That little creature is amazing. I hope to greet her offspring when they emerge. Mary Beth

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: StinkVELB?
Location: Chico, CA
May 31, 2014 10:56 am
I was checking out this elderberry when I noticed these critters. Excited, I rushed to the interwebs to see if they were in fact the elusive VELB. The coloring is that of the female VELB; but the shape is that of a stinkbug. Would it be possible for the two spp. to mingle such that this “stinkVELB” was the product of such a union? And, if not, what bug is this?
Signature: J. Murphy

Conchuela Stink Bug

Conchuela Stink Bug

Dear J. Murphy,
We are amused at your suspicion that this might be a species mingling, and we agree that the coloration and markings of the Stink Bugs in your image resemble the color and markings of the Valley Elderberry Longhorn Beetle as well as some other related subspecies of
Desmocerus aureipennis, including the Golden Winged Elder Borer.  We identified your Stink Bug as the Conchuela Stink Bug, Chlorochroa ligata, thanks to the New Mexico State University website.  According to BugGuide, the Conchuela Stink Bug:  “prefers fleshy fruits of various plants, especially agarita, balsam-gourd and mesquite; also on sage, yucca, mustards, prickly pear (Opuntia), and various crops (cotton, alfalfa, corn, sorghum, grapes, peas, tomatoes, etc.); primarily a seed feeder preferring leguminous plants (once mesquite beans dry, the bugs move to more succulent plants)” and it seems, based on your image, the fruit of Elderberry as well.

Thank you so much for your expertise and time, and for your enchanting website.
Cheers,
-Julia

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Garden bug
Location: North Houston, Texas
May 29, 2014 3:38 pm
I found these guys in my garden on the squash plant. My guess is assasin bug. I’d be happy about that! It would also explain the lack of caterpillars!
Signature: Cliff

Immature Leaf Footed Bugs

Immature Leaf Footed Bugs

Hi Cliff,
In our opinion, these are not Assassin Bug nymphs, but rather Leaf Footed Bug nymphs, probably in the genus
Leptoglossus.  They look very much like the individuals in this BugGuide image.  They are plant feeders and they are not responsible for the dearth of Caterpillars.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Never seen a bug like this!!
Location: Westchester NY
May 30, 2014 7:50 am
My boyfriend is an electrician, and sent me this picture of a strange looking bug he came across in this early summer season. I tried looking it up to see what it may be, but I haven’t been able to get an exact match. I’d really appreciate any input you can provide. Thanks!
Signature: Tiffany

Crane Fly

Crane Fly

Hi Tiffany,
This is a very distinctive species of Crane Fly,
Ctenophora dorsalis, and the presence of an ovipositor indicates she is a female.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Flying spider
Location: Estonia
May 30, 2014 11:08 am
Hi!
I found this insect yesterday (May 30th, 2014) from a sink. From afar it looked like a spider, because it has long legs. It is not a spider though, because it has only six legs and also two wings. The interesting thing about this insect is that it does not use its wings at all, no matter how much you poke it. It only runs really quickly, like a spider, seems like it is meant to live on the ground and not fly. The wings also seem too small to support its size in the air. I have never seen anything like it. I live on the fifth floor of an apartment building in town, so my questions are: What is it and how did it get here?
Here are some features I noticed about this insect: It likes to crawl into narrow dark places. Its body ends with a thick and short tube-like part. The mouthparts look like the closed mouthparts of a horsefly. It rubs its front legs like a housefly (as seen on the third picture). The top of its head is dark-red.
First picture: in the sink beside my finger.
Second picture: on glass, picture taken through the glass (bottom view).
Third picture: same as the second picture.
Thank you!
Signature: Andero

Louse Fly

Louse Fly

Dear Andero,
This is a Louse Fly in the family
Hippoboscidae and it is a true Fly, hence the similarities you observed to a House Fly.  Louse Flies are blood sucking insects and those that have wings can only fly feebly.  Generally Louse Flies are very specific regarding the host, which might be livestock and in some species pigeons and other birds, but when the choice host is not available, they have been known to feed from humans.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unidentified beetle in MN
Location: Central Minnesota
May 30, 2014 7:34 am
I found this beetle this morning crawling in my entry on cement floors. I live in central MN in the country primarily surrounded by pine forests. I thought it was a burying beetle which are endangered and not usually found in MN, but it does not have an orange head. Thank you for your time!
Signature: Carla

Burying Beetle

Burying Beetle

Dear Carla,
You are correct that this is not an American Burying Beetle, but it is another species of Burying Beetle of the genus
Nicrophorus.

Thank you for the information! I was able to further look it up and learned some very interesting things about what is living in my yard!
Carla

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination