From the monthly archives: "April 2014"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Huge centipede
Location: Islamabad, Pakistan
April 25, 2014 1:07 pm
What type of centipede is this? I imagine there are several varieties, depending on geographic location. Thought I would send a photo across.
Location: slightly away from main city. I live in a semi-wild area, so the insects are often larger and more interesting. For example, have found beetles the size of my thumb (I have large hands), in the past, and seen the odd firefly, something one never sees in the city.
I agree, extermination is not the best idea, for the most part. But I confess I find centipedes a little freaky. Am given to understand that the bite is quite nasty. I also have a cat and would rather he not mess about with an insect that could hurt him.
Signature: aspracha

Tropical Centipede

Tropical Centipede

Hi aspracha,
Despite being found in some decidedly untropical locations like Oklahoma, Centipedes in the order Scolopendromorpha, like your individual, are commonly called Tropical Centipedes according to BugGuide.  Yours is a little one, and some individuals found in jungle locations are considerably larger.  BugGuide also states:  “They can bite and also pinch with their last pair of legs. Bites may cause intense pain, swelling, discoloration, numbness, and necrosis, and require medical assistance, although there are no really dangerous, deadly centipedes, and no confirmed human fatalities.”  Here is one of the more amusing letters from our archives.

Tropical Centipede

Tropical Centipede

We hope one of our more knowledgeable readers can supply a species name.  Much as we are trying to understand your fears and your knowledge of the painfulness and side effects of the bite, we feel we need to tag your letter as unnecessary carnage.  Centipedes play a very important role in the food chain and we hate seeing them exterminated because an encounter between a human and a tropical centipede can result in some unpleasantness.

Tropical Centipede

Tropical Centipede

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this
Location: Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
April 24, 2014 5:57 am
Just want to identify this bug
Signature: Jesse Larocque

Woodlouse

Woodlouse

Hi Jesse,
This is a Woodlouse or Sowbug, a type of terrestrial Isopod.  Though they often enter homes, they are considered benign and they will not damage your house or its belongings, unless rotting organic matter is valuable to you because that is what they eat.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Strange/awesome stick bug
Location: Oakland, Ca
April 24, 2014 9:40 am
Bay area, California, April 24th, 2014
Found on car door in garage. What kind of bug is it? Can’t find anything that looks similar to it. Sent the little guy on its way after snapping the pic.
Signature: Thank you!

Plume Moth

Plume Moth

We believe this is one of the Plume Moths in the family Pterophoridae, though the wings appear to be at a 90 degree angle to one another and we are used to seeing them at a straight 180 degree angle, which when combined with the body gives the resemblance to the letter T, causing people to call them T-Bugs.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug identification
Location: Northern Cyprus
April 24, 2014 11:58 pm
We are having an infestation of red bugs here in Cyprus, they range from small to about 10mm in length, any idea thank you. Des Roberts
Signature: Des

Immature Red Bug, we believe

Immature Red Bug, we believe

Hi Des,
We found a matching image on a Natural History Museum forum, but it is identified as a Seed Bug in the genus
Lygaeus, and we don’t agree with that.  We believe this is an immature Red Bug or Firebug in the family Pyrrocoridae, and this image from Cyprus on FlickR has a few nymphs that look very similar to the one in your image.  Maybe Curious Girl who is a frequent contributor to our site can provide some information.

Update:  April 29, 2014
Curious girl provided a lenghty comment that ended in the identification of
Spilostethus pandurus.  See this FlickR image of a nymph.  It is in the Seed Bug family Lygaeidae.  See image of adult here.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bee lovin’!!
Location: Philadelphia, PA
April 23, 2014 4:21 pm
Dearest bugman,
Please accept this photo my friend took of two bees getting intimate on another friend’s shoulder. I think it was too sweet she allowed them to use her shoulder as a love nest.
I feel embarrassed as I do not know what kind of bees these are. Perhaps carpenter bees?
Happy Spring!
Signature: Julianna from VT

Mating Eastern Carpenter Bees

Mating Eastern Carpenter Bees

Dear Julianna,
We are positively blushing at your superlative greeting of endearment.  We find your photo quite amusing, and an interesting counterpoint to an image we posted early this morning of a male Eastern Carpenter Bee being mounted by an unknown and considerably smaller Bee

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: what is this other than a giant scary horned caterpillar
Location: Perth Western Australia
April 24, 2014 3:31 am
Hi! Hoping you can help me out. Saw this creature/monster crawling across my lawn late this afternoon. Its the second one we’ve seen and we’re really curious as to what it will be! It was about 3 inches long (maybe slightly more) and slightly furry looking. Almost like felt. The pics make it look purple but it was more of a beige colour with a bit of red/tan. And those horns!!! Any ideas?
Signature: Nicole

Gum Snout Moth Caterpillar

Gum Snout Moth Caterpillar

Hi Nicole,
We struggled a bit on this identification, but we eventually found some images of your Gum Snout Moth Caterpillar,
Entometa fervens, on the Butterfly House website where it states:  “This is a large fleshy Caterpillar with soft downy hairs. It is sometimes smooth, sometimes rough, sometimes brown, and sometimes mottled with cream and grey. The variable nature of the caterpillars suggests that the name Entometa fervens is being applied to a complex of several species. More investigation is needed to clarify this.  The caterpillar has a prominent projection on the back near the posterior end, and a pair of fleshy filaments behind the head. It is solitary, and feeds at night on a variety of Gum Trees.”  The image on the Queensland Museum site through us off as it looks so different from your images.  It is also pictured on the Brisbane Insect website.

Gum Snout Moth Caterpillar

Gum Snout Moth Caterpillar

Hi Daniel
Thanks very much for taking the time to identify this. Not knowing was killing me J
I have never heard of one of those and have never ever seen anything like this beauty before.
Thanks again for the wonderfully prompt service.
Kindest regards
Nicole J

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination