From the monthly archives: "April 2014"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Ontholestes murinus?
Location: Totton, Southampton, Hampshire (UK)
April 29, 2014 6:06 am
Hello! The other day, we had a visitor to the optical practice where I work. I’m 90% sure this is Ontholestes murinus; I was sure it was a rove beetle at the time and although I wasn’t expecting to get such a precise ID, I stumbled upon O. murinus when researching it later. I can’t tell you anything about where it came from, only that there are a couple of green areas around the corner from the practice and that when I chucked it outside, it took off before it even hit the pavement. It was very fast and had large mandibles, and it did raise his tail a few times as a Devil’s Coach Horse would. What do you think? (PS the numbers on the ruler are millimetres, and also I have more photos if required but sorry they’re not better quality). many thanks in advance.
Signature: Becca

Rove Beetle

Rove Beetle

Dear Becca,
This is definitely a Rove Beetle, and it could well be
Ontholestes murinus, which is pictured on Beetles and Coleopterologists.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Stuck-together butt bug
Location: San Marcos, CA
April 28, 2014 12:31 pm
Hi bugman,
I was taking a walk yesterday in San Marcos, CA (just north of San Diego) and found an odd bug. It looked like two bugs stuck together at their bums. Their bums were red (can’t really tell by the photo…sorry). I thought it might have been just two bugs stuck together but a few paces down the road I saw 2 more like this. It looks like one of the bodies is bigger and it moves in the forward direction that the bigger bodied bug would move. Hope this is enough helpful info to figure out what this is. Thanks!!
Signature: Chloe

Mating Red Shouldered Bugs

Mating Red Shouldered Bugs

Hi Chloe,
Adult Red Shouldered Bugs,
Jadera haematoloma, are frequently found in the mating position.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Rose insect ID?
Location:  San Jose, California
April 28, 2014
Hi Daniel,
Any idea what these are?  Earwig hatchling?
The things are miniscule — on a rose in San Jose California this morning — not sure if the two photos are of same species.
Thanks,
Frank

Thrips

Thrips

Hi Frank
These look like Thrips in the order Thysanoptera to us.  See BugGuide for additional information.

Thrips

Thrips

Thanks — from looking at thrips I agree!!
Just now I got a better photo….
Frank

Thrips

Thrips

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Spiky caterpillar,
Location: central MO, USA
April 28, 2014 7:03 pm
I took a picture of this caterpillar in early September 2006, he was on my tomato plants… I plucked the leaf he was on and put it on a chair so I could try to figure out what he was… never did find out. Here’s the picture, It looks similar to the Mourning Cloak Caterpillar which is on here, but different enough that I think it is a different caterpillar, maybe the spiny elm caterpillar?
Signature: jaelle62

Questionmark Caterpillar

Questionmark Caterpillar

Dear jaelle62,
You actually got quite close with your identification attempt.  We believe this is the caterpillar of a Questionmark,
Polygonia interrogationis, a butterfly in the same tribe as the Mourning Cloak, Nymphalini.  You can compare your image to this image from Bugguide.  Are you growing hops in your garden?  According to BugGuide, the “Caterpillars feed on nettle, false nettle, elms, hackberry, Japanese hops.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What are these
Location: Burkburnett, TX
April 28, 2014 9:43 pm
I have 5 of these hanging in my back patio. Can you tell me what they are?
Signature: Curious in Texas

Mourning Cloak Chrysalides

Mourning Cloak Chrysalides

Dear Curious in Texas,
Do you have an elm or willow tree nearby?  These are the Pupae or Chrysalides of Mourning Cloak Butterflies.  The spiny caterpillars feed on the leaves of elm and willow as well as a few other tree species.  They often migrate away from the food source to begin the metamorphosis process.  Adult Mourning Cloak butterflies are quite pretty with velvety dark wings, cream wing edges and bright blue spots.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: unknown bug
Location: wigan,uk
April 26, 2014 4:41 am
hi, i would like to know if you could help me identify this bug/insect. it was found in my partners car, 3 weeks before this was found i started getting a lot of bites on my legs. i would really appreciate it if you could please help me to understand what it is as i have 2 children ages 2 and 4. thanks.
Signature: mel furda

Backswimmer

Backswimmer

Dear Mel,
This is a Backswimmer in the family Notonectidae, a group of aquatic insects that are capable of flying from pond to pond.  They are sometimes attracted to lights.  Backswimmers do have a painful bite, and they are sometimes called Water Wasps, but we doubt it is responsible for the bites you have gotten on your legs.  Backswimmers will only bite if threatened, carelessly handled, or accidentally encountered while swimming.  They do not leave the water to attack people.  Look on UK Wildlife for some images of Backswimmers, which get their common name because they do swim on their backs.

Hi Daniel thank you for getting back in touch I can now put my mind to rest. Thanks Mel

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination