From the monthly archives: "February 2014"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: I believe I discovered a new water bug
Location: A slew in holt florida black water management
February 20, 2014 12:41 pm
So about a month before spring down in holt, Florida my pals an I were doin alittle fishing. We threw the cricket cage out to try to catch Minos for bait. When we pulled the cage in the weirdest bug I’ve seen in the water so far was sitting on the rim of it. None of us knew what it was and it peaked my interest so automatically I took a picture or two before my friends tried to leave me. Sorry I don’t have more pictures but if it is new id like to claim it.
Signature: Please help, Travis

Damselfly Naiad

Damselfly Naiad

Hi Travis,
We are sorry to disappoint you, but Damselfly Naiads, the aquatic nymphs of an insect related to the Dragonfly, are not a new ID, and different species are found throughout the globe.  We cannot provide you with the species for this Damselfly Naiad, but we can direct you to an image on BugGuide that looks very similar.

Damselfly Naiad

Damselfly Naiad

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: millions of tiny black bugs, what are they?
Location: northwest washington, USA
February 20, 2014 11:00 pm
Hello,
Recently i found an infestation of bugs outside, and i have never seen anything like it. A log appeared to be black, and i didn’t know why. When i got closer to it, i discovered that the entire log was covered in tiny black bugs.
they appear to have 6 legs, and antennae. All over the internet i’ve been unable to find any answer as to what these are.
Roughly 2mm in size, found in february – 2 different occasions in the past two weeks, but during freezing weather, snow, and rain. They showed up in areas that were rained on – logs, ground, sidewalk – and i didn’t find any on the dry logs underneath the shed’s roof.
i was unable to get the best quality photos, but these are two macro shots of the bugs. Just imagine a solid layer of poppy seeds when viewed at a normal distance.
Signature: .

Springtails

Springtails

You discovered Springtails, and though they are benign, they can become a nuisance if conditions are right and they multiply.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Winged insect above snow in mid-February in NH
Location: New London, NH
February 22, 2014 1:51 pm
We were snowshoeing on a trail in New London, NH, on 22 Feb 2014 when we came upon a small swarm of this insect, about a foot above the snow (three feet of snow pack). It wad the warmest day in months, about 44F. As we watched them, they all settled onto the snow and I took a few pictures of one.
Signature: M Wms.

Snow Fly

Winter Crane Fly

Dear M Wms.
This appears to be some species of fly with two wings, and it resembles a Crane Fly, and there is a genus of Crane Flies found in the snow known as Snow Flies, but they are wingless.  We also located and extensive page on Hiking With Chuck that has images that look identical to your fly, and interestingly, they were taken in Arethusa Falls as well as Mine Falls Park in New Hampshire.  All the photos are dated 2007.  We have tried contacting Chen Young and Eric Eaton to see if they have any ideas.

Thank you. “Naturalist Guy” Kenneth Barnett (on Facebook) said it was a snow fly, but this one definitely had wings and they are functional. I’m inclined to think Chuck is right and it’s a winter crane fly. Bug Guide (http://bugguide.net/node/view/8522) photos of the winter crane flies look right, too.
I appreciate your contacting Eric (whom I’ve contacted before about some bugs) and Chen Young; let me know if you learn any more.
~ Molly Williams

Hi Molly,
Thanks so much for providing the BugGuide link.  The Winter Crane Flies in the family Trichoceridae, not to be confused with the wingless Crane Flies known as Snow Flies in the genus
Chionea, look correct to us.  Both are contained in the infraorder Tipulomorpha along with other Crane Flies.  We will let you know if we hear back from Eric or Chen.

Dr. Chen Young confirms identity of Winter Crane Fly
A winter crane fly of the family Trichoceridae.
http://iz.carnegiemnh.org/cranefly/trichoceridae.htm
Chen

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Beautiful moths!
Location: Sylmar, CA
February 22, 2014 12:19 pm
Hi there, I recently found a large moth resting on the sidewalk on my way home and snapped a picture because I hadn’t seen a pattern like it before. Then the next day a saw another! I’ve become obsessed with finding them now! Thanks to your website I know now that they were Striped Morning Spinx. I thought you might enjoy the pictures! Great website!
Signature: New moth hunter

Striped Morning Sphinx

Striped Morning Sphinx

Dear New moth hunter,
We have a Striped Morning Sphinx or Whitelined Sphinx,
Hyles lineata, on our front porch at this moment, and another smaller individual was on the screen door Thursday night.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Found this in my kids’ bathwater
Location: Arkansas
February 20, 2014 11:11 pm
We live in Arkansas and it’s late winter. We found this dead floating in our children’s bath with them. I just wanted to know what it is and if it is something we should worry about. I can’t seem to get a straight answer because everyone I ask thinks it’s something different.
Signature: Kay

Soil Centipede found in Bath Water!!!

Soil Centipede found in Bath Water!!!

Dear Kay,
This is a Centipede, and it appears it is most likely a Soil Centipede in the order Geophilomorpha.  You can compare your individual to the images posted to BugGuide.  Almost exactly one year ago, we received an identification request that prompted a posting on our site entitled Can Centipedes Really Crawl up you Butt??? once we began doing research.  As we noted in the past, the book Sanitary Entomology:  The Entomology of Disease, Hygiene and Sanitation by William Dwight Pierce indicates that pseudoparasitism by Soil Centipedes is possible in the nasal and alimentary passages of humans.  You might want to consult with your physician on this matter.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Cyprus Longhorn Beetle Cerambycidae Certallum ebulinum ruficolle Fabricius…?
Location: Nicosia (Leftkoşa), Cyprus
February 22, 2014 5:10 am
Hello Daniel, I think I have this one pegged (so to speak). I was detoured by the tanbark borer but it was not quite right so I kept looking, finally coming up with Longhorn Beetle Cerambycidae Certallum ebulinum ruficolle Fabricius (but not sure all those designations are needed because I do not know what they all mean…).
Is this a Capricorn beetle? If so it would be even more nifty as the Mouflon is the moutain goat (ibex) that is featured on the Cypriot euro coins.
Thanks!
Signature: Curious Girl

Longicorn:

Longicorn:  Certallum ebulinum ruficolle

Hi Curious Girl,
Using the name you provided, we found a nearly identical image on a Cyrillic language Coleoptera page and an image of a mating pair on Biolib.
  Regarding the name, Cyrambycidae is the name for the family.  The next three words are the taxonomic name for the genus, species and subspecies.  Fabricius is the authority credited with first publishing the name, and that should be followed by a year, which in the case of this beetle is 1781.  Longicorns are often called Capricorns, but we personally generally reserve that for larger species.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination