From the monthly archives: "February 2014"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Weta bug?? In the Pilbara
Location: Tom Price
February 1, 2014 6:57 am
Hi. I work in Tom Price in the Pilbara region of Western Australia. I have seen this (what looks to be a female juvenile) weta walking around at night. But from all my research they are from New Zealand. .. can you tell me if they have been seen here before. None of the locals knew what it was…
Signature: Peta Louise

King Cricket

King Cricket

Dear Peta Louise,
Wetas and King Crickets belong to the family Anontostomatidae, and according to records posted to the Atlas of Living Australia, there are sightings from Pilbara.  While the Weta species found in New Zealand may be endemic and not found in Australia, there are representatives of the family in Australia where the common name King Cricket is used.  You can view some images of both female and male King Crickets,
Australostoma australasia,  on Aussie Pythons & Snakes.  You are correct that this is a female, but not necessarily a juvenile.  We also located a matching photo on FlickR.  Because they are large and formidable looking, King Crickets are often victims of Unnecessary Carnage.  We are tagging your submission as the Bug of the Month for February 2014.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Please identify
Location: NW Arkansas, USA
January 31, 2014 9:59 pm
This bug has wings and a proboscis thingy that it “bit” me with. The bite didn’t itch, it stung and hurt. I’ve lived in several states and never seen it before.
Signature: Thanks for your help, Amy

Assassin Bug

Assassin Bug

Hi Amy,
You were bitten by an Assassin Bug in the genus
ZelusWhile the bite is reported to be painful and the effects last several days, there will be no lasting harm to you.  Assassin Bugs are important predators that occasionally find their way indoors.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination