From the monthly archives: "February 2014"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Ant mimic true bug
Location: Osa Peninsula, Costa Rica
February 28, 2014 7:16 am
My husband and I found this early instar bug while in Corcovado NP, Costa Rica in February 2014. It was definitely mimicking an ant. It was one of the neatest insects we saw during our trip. Thank you!
Signature: Laura

Ant Mimic

Ant Mimic might be Peanut Headed Bug

Hi Laura,
This is such a strange looking creature.  We wonder if it might be an immature Peanut Headed Bug.  We have a photo of hatchling Peanut Headed Bugs on our site, but no early instar nymphs.

Thank you! It does look like an early instar peanut-headed bug! Interesting that the early instars are ant mimics. We thought it was an ant at first until we took a closer look.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Large black and red butterfly
Location: Phnom Penh, Cambodia
February 28, 2014 3:53 am
Dear WhatsThatBug.com,
I have just found this butterfly in the stairwell of my apartment building in Phnom Penh, Cambodia.
It couldn’t find it’s way out and me and my teacher were worried that someone else would kill it. So I got a bowl and some paper and set it free outside. It flew all around the building for a while before we lost track of it.
I have seen this butterfly a few times and I’m just interested in it. Hopefully you can give me an answer.
Thank you
🙂
Signature: Chloe (age 14)

Swallowtail

Common Rose Swallowtail

Hi Chloe,
When someone sends us an email that indicates unusual kindness to an insect or other bug, we like to tag that posting with the Bug Humanitarian Award, and your identification request is one of those postings.
  According to The Flying Kiwi Cambodian bug page:  “This is a common rose, a type of swallowtail butterfly.   They earn their name from their wide distribution, all the way from Afghanistan to China, and from belonging to the genus Atrophaneura, the red-bodied swallowtails.   In this case, the red body indicates to birds and other predators that the butterfly is toxic and distasteful to eat.”  Because this species is poisonous, other species have evolved to mimic it, and the Confessions of a Lepidopterist site states:  “The red spots on these butterflies [Common Mormons] were actually made to mimic another species of butterfly alltogether. The Crimson Rose butterfly (another one of my favourites) that is poisonous and therefore unedible to birds and other predators. The Common Mormon female (carrying the eggs and thus, the lifeline of the butterfly species) has evolved to mimic the wings of Crimson Rose butterflies thus avoiding being eaten. To the trained eye, however, these two butterflies can be distinguished quite simply. The Crimson Rose, as its name suggests come from the family of red-bodied swallowtails that is to say their bodies are colored a brilliant red, advertising the poison that actualy runs in their blood.”  According to TrekNature:  “The Common Rose (Atrophaneura (Pachliopta) aristolochiae) is a swallowtail butterfly belonging to the Pachliopta subgenus, the Roses, of the genus Atrophaneura or Red-bodied Swallowtails. It is a common butterfly which is extensively distributed across South and South East Asia.”    

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: couch and house bug
Location: Houston area, Texas
February 27, 2014 3:08 pm
I have found this bug all around my house. On my couch, on the floor, on the wall. It is winter now though there are more in the summer. I am in south Texas.
Thanks!
Signature: CEM

Variegated Carpet Beetle

Variegated Carpet Beetle

Dear CEM,
This is an adult Variegated Carpet Beetle or Varied Carpet Beetle and they often attract attention when they congregate at windows in an effort to leave the home.  Adult Carpet Beetles feed on pollen, but the larvae of Carpet Beetles feed on a “wide variety of materials of animal origin (wool, fur, skins…)(1); stored food materials and products (biscuits, cakes, seeds, wheat, maize, oats, rice, cayenne pepper, cacao, and dried cheese); adults feed on pollen”
according to BugGuide.  The larvae will also feed on the dead insects that accumulate in light fixtures and windowsills.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Big Moth
Location: Prescott Valley, AZ
February 26, 2014 12:36 pm
My co-worker and I saw this moth on the ground and I was amazed at the size. Just curious as to what it is and is it native to central Arizona (Prescott Valley).
Signature: Dave Eagling

Glover's Silkmoth

Glover’s Silkmoth

Dear Dave,
This Glover’s Silkmoth,
Hyalophora columbia gloveri, is a western subspecies.  You can read more on BugGuide.

Glover's Silkmoth

Glover’s Silkmoth

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unknown bug
Location: Richards Bay KZN SA
February 27, 2014 6:50 am
HI
I took this image or a few from my garden in Richards Bay, KZN, SA. It was sucking nectar on a bush known to draw butterflies. Could you possibly identify it?
Signature: Pauline Hibbert

Splendrous Hornet Moth

Splendrous Hornet Moth

Dear Pauline,
This is either a Splendrous Hornet Moth,
Euchromia formosa, or a closely related species in the same genus.  You can compare your excellent image to the one on Encyclopaedia Britannica or the ones on ISpot.

Splendrous Hornet Moth

Splendrous Hornet Moth

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: UK Unknown Bug
Location: London
February 26, 2014 8:23 am
Hi i just killed a bug that i saw and i have never seen anything like it in the UK i asked my family n friends and they have never seen anything like it too and i can’t find anything on it on the internet. hope you can identify it please?
Signature: Craig Tanner

Western Conifer Seed Bug

Western Conifer Seed Bug

Hi Craig,
The Western Conifer Seed Bug, is a North American species native to the Pacific Northwest.  As early as the 1960s, its North American range was greatly expanded, probably influenced by being able to stow away with the belongings of humans who are getting increasingly more mobile.  We learned that they were first documented in Northern Europe in the early years of the 21st millenium, and it appears that this Invasive Exotic species is now firmly established in the Old World.  British Bugs has additional information.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination