From the yearly archives: "2013"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Fly, beetle or spider hybrid
Location: baldwin park, ca
September 15, 2013 4:17 am
I have found three of these guys in my house. One just flew away with his life never to be heard from again, one my daughter accidently squashed and then this guy seemed to take a liking to my room, bunked who knows where & occasionally made either a strutting appearance on my wall or did a fly by. I didn’t see him again for a few days (definitely male, sheesh!) only to have the misfortune of walking on the nape of my neck whilst laying in my bed engrossed in a book & I slapped the back of my neck, jumped up and found him clinging to the back of my pj’s via one leg, taking a few last breaths. Anywho, I am curious to know what type of fly/beetle/spider this is as I have never seen this before I moved here. He was the size of a house fly but the body is flat and and diamond shaped and appeared to have a hard shelled body opposed to a fly.
Signature: mr serojo

Louse Fly

Louse Fly

Dear mr serojo,
This is a Louse Fly in the family Hippoboscidae.  Louse Flies feed on the blood of mammals or birds, and some species are very particular about the host animal.  Hosts include pigeons, deer and sheep.  If you live near an agricultural community, it might explain the number of recent sightings.  Some species of Louse Flies attach to a host animal and then lose their wings, continuing to feed and no longer needing any mobility.  Without a preferred host, the individual you swatted on your neck might have been preparing to take a bite out of you.  Louse Flies are also called Keds.

Thank you kindly for the reply. I so seldom receive an answer from sites.  We just moved to a condo and a whole family of pigeons live in the central a/c unit that’s atop our roof. We have been pestering our landlord to properly cover the unit as they bunker inside, come out mornings and leave their gifts on our windows and patio. I have to admit I was more comfortable with my hybrid super bug; hearing the word louse is never pleasant, especially knowing you may have been the subpar – you will have to do” meal.
Again, thanks for the reply!

While we cannot speak for other websites, we do try our best to respond to as many requests as possible, but the fact of the matter is that we receive more mail than our tiny staff can handle.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: White-Lined Sphinx at Night
Location: Naperville, IL
September 14, 2013 7:17 pm
Hi Daniel~
I’ve never seen one of these beautiful moths until a few evenings ago. Since then, I’ve seen them a number of times, feeding from buddleia, zinnias, and hibiscus trees, usually at dusk. And I can’t tell you how many friends saw them and mentioned them to me as well, wondering what they were. I had to use a flash because there was just no way to capture its colorful wings without it.
All the best to you!
Signature: Dori Eldridge

Whitelined Sphinx

Whitelined Sphinx

Hi Dori,
Your stunning photo has frozen the rapidly beating wings of this lovely Whitelined Sphinx.  Upon watching them feed, it is easy to understand why they are often confused for hummingbirds.  Because the caterpillars are able to feed on a large variety of plants, the Whitelined Sphinx is found in all 48 lower states as well as Canada, and it might be the most common Sphinx Moth in North America.  Populations of Whitelined Sphinxes tend to rise and fall depending upon the year, and when conditions are ideal in the southwest, there are huge explosions in the populations of both the caterpillars and the adults.  Zinnias are wonderful flowers to plant when you want to attract butterflies and other pollinating insects.

Thank you, Daniel! I agree with your statement about zinnias. I have seen more new species of pollinators this year all over my back yard where I planted lots of zinnias this past spring. And hummingbirds are also fans of them. Have a lovely weekend!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Butterfly and, i think, moth
Location: Edmonton,AB Canada
September 14, 2013 8:08 pm
Hi, i`ve spotted this two beauties in my garden. Butterfly in end of August, and second large Butterfly or maybe it`s a moth beginning of June. I live in Edmonton Alberta, Canada. I love everything about garden and what`s flying around it .
I`m sending one pic. of butterfly and 2 pics of Butt./moth. which was about 6-7cm by 10-11cm in size.
Please let me know what are those . I`m not in a rush to hear the answer, but whenever you have time.
Thanks alot
Oxana
Signature: Oxana

Anglewing

Anglewing

Hi Oxana,
Your butterfly is one of the Anglewings in the genus Polygonia, but we cannot say for certain which species.  We suspect it is the Eastern Comma,
Polygonia comma, but we are not certain.  Perhaps one of our readers can make a more definitive identification.  See BugGuide for more information on the Anglewings.  Your moth is a Polyphemus Moth.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

http://bugguide.net/node/view/148447Subject: beetle with orange ”antlers” – central Ohio
Location: north central Ohio
September 14, 2013 7:08 pm
A friend saw this beetle on his screen door tonight. He said it was about an inch long. I thought maybe it was a variegated June beetle, but it has pincers and it looks like it’s shiny. This was seen in north central Ohio.
Signature: Sharon G

Cedar Beetle

Cedar Beetle

September 15, 2013 5:56 AM
I finally found it: identified it as a male Sandalus niger. Thanks!

Hi Sharon,
We are happy to learn you have identified your male Cedar Beetle,
Sandalus niger.  The Cicada Parasite Beetles resemble Scarab Beetles, but they diverge at the suborder level of taxonomy.  This is not a commonly reported species to our site, so we are very happy to have a new photograph.  We originally posted an image of a Cedar Beetle two years ago and that was the first representative on our site, and it was also from central Ohio.  According to BugGuide:  “Larvae probably feed on Cycada nymphs. Adults very short lived.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Small Unknown Bug
Location: Hawthorne, CA
September 13, 2013 2:22 pm
Hi Daniel,
This tiny bug was on a Mexican Milkweed leaf in the back today. Do you know what it is?
Signature: Thanks, Anna Carreon

Unknown Beetle on Milkweed

Case Bearing Leaf Beetle on Milkweed

Hi Anna,
This is not a True Bug.  Because of the larger number of antennae segments, this can be identified as a beetle, but it doesn’t really look like a Leaf Beetle.  We will try to research this more later.

Thank you, Daniel.  Any help you can provide will be helpful.
Anna

We will try to get some assistance from Eric Eaton.

Eric Eaton provides a classification
Hi, Daniel:
It actually *is* a leaf beetle, one of the case-bearing (as larvae) leaf beetles in the Cryptocephalinae subfamily.  This is probably a species of Pachybrachis.  Nice image considering how small they are.
Eric

Daniel & Eric,
Thank you for this identification.  Got a new camera and am pleased with what it can do!
Anna

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: parasite update!
Location: Hugh MacRae Park Wilmington, NC
September 13, 2013 11:18 am
Hi Curious Creature Catcher here!!
I have an update from my last message:
September 13, 2013 2:09 pm
Three new parasites have exited the body of the cicada. My thoughts would be that they feasted on the insides, as they have left the shell of the body intact. I know for sure that they did come from the inside, but I do not know how they exited other than through the anus. Could these be Cicada Parasite Beetles?
Thanks in advance!!

Cicada with Parasites

Cicada with Parasites

my last comment:
”September 13, 2013 8:55 AM
Hello! I was in a park in Wilmington N.C. and picked up a cicada that was lying on a black paved walkway. It seemed to have just recently died, as it’s limbs and body were not stiff. I decided to take it home and placed it in the center of an empty console of my car. Upon arriving home in addition to the cicada I saw what appeared to be a parasite wiggling around in the console that measures just over a half of an inch. In observing the cicada even closer I have noticed that several body parts (head, beak and anus) are moving as if something is inside of it! Back to the parasite- it seems to have one tooth or claw like feature in the front that helps it move about. If it did come from inside the cicada I am not sure how it came out unless it was through the opening of the anus, as there are no other openings that appear on the cicada. Could this be the larva stage of a cicada killer wasp? If so, could the wasp have laid more than one egg and there are more inside of th e cica
da. Also, I thought the wasp would have taken the cicada underground- not left it on a paved walkway…”
Signature: Curious Creature Catcher

Cicada and Parasite

Cicada and Parasite

Dear Curious Creature Catcher,
This will require a bit more research on our part, but we want to post it with our initial reaction.  We do not think this parasite looks like it will metamorphose into a beetle.  You are correct that Cicada Killers drag the prey to a burrow where a single egg is laid.  Our gut instinct is that this is a fly larva, perhaps that of a Tachinid Fly.  According to BugGuide:  “Larval stages are parasitoids of other arthropods; hosts include members of 11 insect orders, centipedes, spiders, and scorpions. Some tachinids are very host-specific, others parasitize a wide variety of hosts. The most common hosts are caterpillars. Most tachinids deposit their eggs directly on the body of their host, and it is not uncommon to see caterpillars with several tachinid eggs on them. Upon hatching the larva usually burrows into its host and feeds internally. Full-grown larva leaves the host and pupates nearby. Some tachinids lay their eggs on foliage; the larvae are flattened and are called planidia; they remain on the foliage until they find a suitable host.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination