From the yearly archives: "2013"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Pyramid Head
Location: Central Coast, Australia
December 30, 2013 5:25 am
Hey, I found this bug on the side of my house and (obviously) have no idea what its is
I dubbed it pyramid head, named after the monster from silent hill.
thank you in advance.
Signature: Amber

Leafhopper

Leafhopper

Dear Amber,
While we have not been able to quickly find a conclusive species match for your Free Living Hemipteran, we are relatively confident that it is a Leafhopper in the family Cicadellidae, and probably a Flatheaded Leafhopper in the subfamily Ledrinae.  The Brisbane Insect website has a few photos of immature specimens that bear a resemblance to your insect.  PaDIL, the Pests and Diseases Image Library has a page on the Glassy Winged Sharpshooter and other native insects is can be confused with, and though many of those look similar, none seems to be an exact match either.  We continued to search and then we discovered the World’s Largest Leafhopper,
Ledromorpha planirostris, back on the Brisbane Insect website, and we are relatively confident that is your species.  We don’t understand how we missed it the first pass we made on the Brisbane Insect website.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Western Conifer Seed Bug…I think
Location: Irvine, CA
December 29, 2013 3:11 pm
I spent so much time admiring this handsome critter that I was late clocking back in from lunch! Thanks to your website in conjunction with Google image search, I believe it to be a Western Conifer Seed Bug, or some closely related species. Sorry for the poor quality of the photo; it was taken with my cell phone. Thank you for your entertaining and informative website, and for your assistance in IDing this little guy. Gal. Bug.
Signature: SMTO

Western Conifer Seed Bug

Western Conifer Seed Bug

Dear SMTO,
We wish we were flies on the wall when you had to explain to your boss that you were late from lunch because you were enthralled by a bug.  This invasive exotic species is nowhere near as exciting as some of our native species.  You might miss the end of the week should you ever encounter a Tarantula Hawk, a Western Shorthorned Walkingstick, a Mourning Cloak or a Potato Bug, which can all be found in Irvine.

Thank you for the quick response!  Actually, it was easy to explain, since I was taking the picture when my boss got back from his own lunch break.  And yes, potato bugs–we find those in our yard quite often.  The dogs are freaked out by them 🙂  I’ve never taken any pics of those, but I do have some (in my humble opinion) nice shots of a mourning cloak hanging out on a motorcycle.

Thank you for attaching your Mourning Cloak photo.  We used a lovely image of a Viceroy on a Motorcycle when we produced a What’s That Bug? calendar back in 2006.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Colorful bug from Peru
Location: peru near Machu Picchu
December 29, 2013 4:01 pm
I have found out that this bug is from Peru, that’s all the info I have.
Signature: Brandon

Immature Leaf Footed Bug

Immature Leaf Footed Bug

Hi Brandon,
This is an immature Leaf Footed Bug in the family Coreidae, and we already have it represented in our archives, however the image submitted in 2008 was never identified to the genus or species level.  It continues to remind us of the Giant Mesquite Bug nymphs from the genus Thasus, however this individual lacks the modified, flattened antennae feature that is evident in that genus.  We are still not able to provide a conclusive identification as we have not had any luck locating other images that match on the internet.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Please help
Location: Anza, CA
December 28, 2013 9:12 pm
I found these guys in my home. I have lived here for ten years and have never seen them before. I have taken an insect identification class before, but I am not experienced enough to figure this out. It looks like a Hemiptera of some sort. It’s about a millimeter long and it is pretty difficult to get a picture of it. It’s winter here in Southern California, and I am in the high desert. Could you please help? I don’t think it is the brown marmorated stink bug because it doesn’t have true bug characteristics and there’s no odor. I suspect it is coming in through a crack somewhere for warmth, but who knows what it is. I don’t think it is butting me or my animals because it doesn’t have apparent piercing/sucking mouthparts. Please help.
Signature: Cass

Dirt Colored Seed Bug nymph, perhaps

Dirt Colored Seed Bug nymph, perhaps

Dear Cass,
Though your photo is blurry, your immature Hemipteran closely resembles the bugs in this photo from our archives that we tentatively identified as Dirt Colored Seed Bug nymphs, though there is some question that they might be Chinch Bug nymphs.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: what’s that bug?
Location: Caracas, Venezuela
December 28, 2013 1:21 pm
Just saw this thing in my yard, it didn’t move, but it seems to be eating that leaf. Do you know what it is?
Signature: ukimalefu

Monkey Slug from Venezuela

Monkey Slug from Venezuela

Dear ukimalefu,
Your caterpillar bears such a strong resemblance to the Monkey Slug, the caterpillar of the Hag Moth,
Phobetron pithecium, that we believe it must be a close relative in the same genus, or perhaps even the same species.  See BugGuide for a matching photo, and see BugGuide‘s information page for things that might apply to a South American relative, including the fact that Monkey Slugs are stinging caterpillars and they should be handled with extreme caution.  FlickR has a photo from Venezuela that is identified as Phobetron hipparchia.

Yes, it definitely looks like the monkey slug. Thanks!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: is this a kind of False Blister Beetle?
Location: Barbados
December 26, 2013 6:57 pm
Hi,
I was out doing some macro work today and saw a couple of these black and red beetles. The closest match i found on Google was a red and black false blister beetle, but none of the images had the exact dimple pattern on back. They were about 1cm in length and were found on some grass.
Thanks
Signature: Niaz

Leaf Beetle

Leaf Beetle probably Anisostena cyanoptera

Dear Niaz,
Your photos are of an excellent quality, and they greatly aided our ability to provide you with an identification.  We did need to crop your images to maximize the size of the beetle, which meant we needed to move your trademark logo within the image.  This is not a Blister Beetle.  It is a Leaf Beetle in the family Chrysomelidae.  We located a very close match on BugGuide,
Anisostena ariadne.  Once we had a genus name, we were able to try to search for relatives in Barbados, and though there is no photograph, Anisostena cyanoptera is listed on the Coleoptera Neotropical page for the Antilles.  Though we could not locate any images of Anisostena cyanoptera, we believe that is the correct identification for your Leaf Beetle.

Leaf Beetle

Leaf Beetle probably Anisostena cyanoptera

Hi Daniel,
Thanks for the information and effort, it is greatly appreciated. Don’t worry about relocating the logo that’s fine. I’m actually in a bit of a dilemma, on one hand would like to contribute images to your amazing website but on the other I don’t want to give you any extra work lol.
I have a macro album on Facebook if you want to see more images. Just look me up Niaz Dokrat ‎.
Regards and best wishes for the new year,
Niaz

Hi Niaz,
It wasn’t much trouble.  Feel free to send any images you would like to have identified or any that you think would be a good addition to our site.  I don’t believe we have many images from Barbados in our archives.  We will identify and post what we have the time to devote to, and when we are especially busy, many submissions go unanswered.  This is a slower time of the year for us.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination