From the yearly archives: "2013"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Stout’s Hardwood Borer
Location: Central Hollywood
May 22, 2013 7:56 pm
This is an insect I understand is under represented on your site. I have seen tow of them in and around my apartment. I think it is kinda cute, but it’s jaws scare me a little. I put him outside by the big OLD tree. I hope he is happy there.
Signature: Jessica Brecker

Stout's Hardwood Borer

Stout’s Hardwood Borer

Dear Jessica,
We felt obligated to lighten and crop your image.  We are very impressed with your graphic composition.  You have good sense to be cautious about the mandibles of the Stout’s Hardwood Borer.  It chews its way out of dead wood including, we suspect, telephone poles when it ecloses into an adult.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Chillin’ California Trap Door Spider Beauty
Location: San Pedro, CA
May 22, 2013 7:09 pm
Look who I found! A big beauty in San Pedro in April, 2013. My friend called me and said she’d found a pipe in her bare-earth backyard. She then called back and said it was a tube. I came by to investigate. We gently opened a few trap doors and this beauty clung to the top of her trap door, so I gently removed her. After a weak threat display, I picked her up, took photos, and gently placed her back, thanking her and closing her trap door.
Signature: Darlene King

Female California Trapdoor Spider

Female California Trapdoor Spider

Dear Darlene,
Thank you so much for sending us this exciting posting.  Though we have numerous photos of male California Trapdoor Spiders,
Bothriocyrtum californicum, photos of females are noticeable absent on our site.  We believe your identification is correct because of the resemblance to this California Trapdoor Spider on BugGuide.  Up until recently, the information page on BugGuide has been quite spare, but this marvelous addition is quite fascinating: “According to Guinness World Records, as of 2009, this is the strongest spider. It has been able to resist a force 38 times its own weight when defending its trapdoor. This equates to a man trying to hold a door closed while it is being pulled on the other side by a small jet plane!(1) Unfortunately, the Guinness book doesn’t mention if it’s the strongest North American spider or if it’s the strongest in the world. Also, one thing to think about is whether or not every spider’s strength has been measured. I guess one can safely say that the information is flawed in that aspect, but it still asserts the fact that these spiders ARE very strong.”Because of habitat loss in urban areas, California Trapdoor Spiders are becoming scarcer in many parts of their range, including Los Angeles, where the preservation of more open space might be a necessity for their survival.  Our own nearly 36 acre natural gem, Elyria Canyon Park, is likely a contributing factor in the presence of California Trapdoor Spiders where males frequently fall into swimming pools at the start of rainy season.  Me must say we are quite impressed with your handling of this large but benign spider.  Trapdoor Spiders wait patiently in their lairs to pounce upon any small arthropod or possibly even small vertebrate that crosses their perimeter. 

Female California Trapdoor Spider

Female California Trapdoor Spider

We like the use of the dogs for scale.

Almost as big as a dog: Female California Trapdoor Spider

Almost as big as a dog: Female California Trapdoor Spider

 


What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: what kind of bug is this
Location: manchester,connecticut
May 22, 2013 6:45 am
This was found at 9am in Connecticut. It had rained pretty hard with thunder and lightning the night before. I legt to bring the kids to school and daycare. Which took about 30 minutes and it was in the same position when I got back.
Signature: norm delaura

Crane Flies Mating

Crane Flies Mating

Hi Norm,
These are mating Crane Flies in the infraorder Tipulomorpha which can be browsed on BugGuide if you want to try to determine the species.  Because of their long legs, Crane Flies were named after the long legged wading birds called cranes.  Crane Flies are mistakenly called Mosquito Hunters in some parts of the country.  Most Crane Flies do not eat as adults and they do not bite humans.  We will contact Dr. Chen Young who runs the Crane Flies of Pennsylvania website to see if he is able to provide a species identification.

Dr. Chen Young responds:
A mating pair of Tipula trivittata.
Chen

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Weird bug with turtle shape
Location: Southern Connecticut
May 21, 2013 1:09 pm
The bug crawled over to my friend, and we both hadn’t seen anything like it. She immediately noticed what looks like a turtle on the back of the bug, while the edges are semi-translucent. We brought it outside and it disappeared shortly after.
Signature: AF

Clavate Tortoise Beetle

Clavate Tortoise Beetle

Dear AF,
Obviously the Clavate Tortoise Beetle is aptly named if you thought it resembled a turtle.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Green 6 legged insect with 2 wings and long antanae
Location: San Antonio Texas
May 21, 2013 3:05 pm
I’ve never seen this insect before
Signature: Marcus Guerra

Male Truncated True Katydid Nymph

Male Central Texas Leaf Katydid Nymph

Hi Marcus,
We believe this is a male Central Texas Leaf Katydid nymph,
Paracyrtophyllus robustus, also known as the Truncated True Katydid.  We identified it on BugGuide.  Most of our photos are of the red form, so it is nice to receive your photo of the green form.  BugGuide notes:  “‘Red Katydid’ – vernacular name in Texas. Isolated individuals are green, whereas outbreak individuals are mostly pink.”  This must not be an outbreak year.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Flat shaped black colored flying insect
Location: living room, bedroom
May 21, 2013 5:37 pm
Flat shaped black colored flying insect, very irritating and stubborn.
Signature: .

Louse Fly

Louse Fly

Dear .,
This is a Louse Fly in the family Hippoboscidae.  Adults feed on blood.  According to BugGuide:  “Most are host specific on bird species, with a few occurring on mammals.”  One species feeds on the blood of sheep and is known as the Sheep Ked.  Perhaps you live near an area where sheep are raised, but since we don’t know where you are located, we cannot say for certain.  If their preferred host is not available, opportunistic Louse Flies may bite humans.

Your concern was appreciated, keep it going!
As for my location, my locality homes quite many pigeons and cats, if that’s what these Louse Flies are feeding on.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination