From the yearly archives: "2013"

Subject: They’re Everywhere!
Location: Holden Beach, NC
May 25, 2013 5:08 pm
These bugs are on our porch railings, lined up in a conga line. Touch them and they fly away!
They form lines or groups. Birds seem to ignore them.
Signature: Tom on the Beach

Lablab Bug

Lablab Bug

Dear Tom on the Beach,
This invasive, exotic species is a recently introduced True Bug from China known as the Lablab Bug, Kudzu Bug or Bean Plataspid,
Megacopta cribraria.  It is a known pest on several crops including soybeans and its one benefit is that it feeds on another invasive species, Kudzu.  See the University of Georgia article entitled Megacopta cribraria as a Nuisance Pest for more information.

Subject: Beautiful insect from Guatemala
Location: Guatemala
May 25, 2013 7:53 pm
My daughter took this photo in Guatemala of what I think must be the most beautiful insect in the world. I am curious to know more about this insect, and what function its beautiful markings might serve. I tried to find out more about it through Google images, and found a photo of another specimen, but with no useful information (https://contest.thesca.org/sites/default/files/imagecache/large/IMG_2098.JPG ) Can you tell me about this insect?
Signature: Ed Max

Giant Mesquite Bug Nymph

Giant Mesquite Bug Nymph

Hi Ed,
This is the nymph of a Leaf Footed Bug in the genus
Thasus, and they are commonly called Giant Mesquite Bugs.  They are edible, which is interesting since the color would most likely be described as aposomatic or warning coloration.  We have not been successful in identifying this particular insect to the species level, but we are confident that the genus Thasus is correct.

Subject: Crawfish Hanging Out In the Street
Location: Northeastern US (Western MA)
May 24, 2013 8:08 pm
I found this bug in the road and have no idea what it is. If anyone has any idea what type of bug it is my thirst for knowledge would be satisfied as far as bugs I have found in the road goes. It was probably about 3-5 inches in length. Thanks everyone for any help.
Signature: The Bug Discoverer

Crawfish

Crawfish

Hi Bug Discoverer,
Crawfish, Crayfish and Crawdad are all commonly used names for this small crustacean.

Subject: What’s this bug?
Location: Dallas, North Texas
May 24, 2013 4:46 pm
Hi! I live in Dallas and found this bug today. The underside of it is flesh colored with blood red spots and looks fleshy. It looks like a caterpillar of some sort. I live behind a wooded creek area and this was found near my pecan tree.
Thanks for any info!
Signature: Debra

Underwing Caterpillar

Underwing Caterpillar

Hi Debra,
We believe this is an Underwing Moth Caterpillar in the genus
Catocala.  Here is a photo from our archives and one from BugGuide with the “underside of it is flesh colored with blood red spots and looks fleshy” that you described.

Subject: Moth
Location: Minneapolis, MN
May 24, 2013 2:33 pm
I found this rather attractive black & white moth hanging out on a footpath on my way to work.
This is near the University of MN in Minneapolis. We’re having a cool/cold/late spring this year and this particular day was cold and overcast.
My limited-skill attempts to identify it have led me nowhere.
Signature: Darren Abbey

Grapevine Epimenis

Grapevine Epimenis

Hi Darren,
This is an exciting submission for us as it is an underrepresented species for our site.  We quickly identified this distinctive Owlet Moth as a Grapevine Epimenis,
Psychomorpha epimenis, thanks to BugGuide where we learned:  “The common name is unusual in that it contains the species epithet; the normal practice is to use the genus name, as in ‘Grapevine Psychomorpha.'”  There is only a hint of red showing on the underwings, but some of the photos on BugGuide show a striking large red patch that is hidden in your image.

In retrospect, there were grape vines growing adjacent to the trail where this was found.
Darren

Providing the larval food plants is one of the surest ways to attract specific butterflies and moths.

Subject: Caterpillar Procession
Location: Monte Verità, Ascona, Switzerland
May 24, 2013 1:57 am
Hi,
I photographed these caterpillars in mid-April at Monte Verita, in the hills above Ascona, Switzerland. The length of the caterpillar procession was around 6 feet. They were moving pretty quickly, clearing the path in under 10 minutes. It was a warm day, between 75 and 80 degrees, and one of the first warm days of the season in the area from what I was told.
Thought you might be interested. We love your site- thank you for all you do!!
Signature: Jennifer P.

Pine Processionary Moth Caterpillars

Pine Processionary Moth Caterpillars

Hi Jennifer,
Thanks so much for sending us your photos of the Pine Processionary Moth Caterpillars,
Thaumetopoea pityocampa.  According to the Wildlife in France website:  “In the spring, anytime from February until May, the caterpillars leave the trees and go down to the ground, this is when we will see them forming their long nose to tail processions as they make their way to find a place in the soil to pupate, the period of pupation can last a couple of months or several years. They actually touch each other to make a long chain, hence the common name of Pine processionary moth.”  The Pine Processionary Moth Caterpillars should not be handled because, according to the UK Forestry Commission website:  “caterpillars represent a public health hazard because they have thousands of hairs which contain an urticating, or irritating, protein called thaumetopoein. These hairs can be blown by the wind into contact with people and animals, resulting in painful skin irritations and rashes and, in some cases, allergic reactions in some people and animals.”

Pine Processionary Caterpillars

Pine Processionary Caterpillars

This must have been a very impressive procession to watch.

Pine Processionary Moth Caterpillars

Pine Processionary Moth Caterpillars