From the yearly archives: "2013"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: what type of moth caterpillar
Location: Prescott Valley, AZ Yavapai county
September 11, 2013 9:05 pm
What type of moth will this caterpillar become??
Signature: AJ

Davis' Tussock Moth Caterpillar

Davis’ Tussock Moth Caterpillar

Hi Dave,
We have identified your caterpillar on BugGuide as Davis’ Tussock Moth Caterpillar,
Halysidota davisii, and it is a new species for our site.  BugGuide also has an image of the adult moth, one of the Tiger Moths.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Possible Stinging Caterpillar?
Location: Southwestern Shaanxi Province, China
September 12, 2013 1:55 am
Hi Daniel,
I came across this caterpillar on the footpath of the gardens outside our apartment block when I was walking my dogs. I didn’t touch it directly as it looked like it had stinging bristles but I encouraged it onto a leaf and put it onto a bush so it wouldn’t get trodden on (or sting one of my dogs if they saw it and gave it a sniff).
Except for the colouration, it looks superficially similar to the zephyr-eyed silk moth caterpillar pictured on your site so I was wondering if it could possibly be a different kind of silk moth caterpillar?
Signature: Paul UK

Unknown Saturniid Caterpillar

Unknown Saturniid Caterpillar

Hi Paul,
We agree that this is most likely a stinging Caterpillar, and it is probably in the family Saturniidae which includes the Zephyr-Eyed Silkmoth, however that species has a very limited range in New Mexico and vicinity and the genus it belongs to is strictly new world.  This also looks similar to some Nymphalidae or Brush-Footed Butterfly Caterpillars which includes the Mourning Cloak Caterpillar, but our gut instinct is still a Saturniidae Caterpillar.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Tropical Weevil: Brentus anchorago
Location: Key Largo, Florida
September 11, 2013 8:13 pm
Saw this on the side of my house today after a heavy down pour. I’m in Key Largo.
My yard is full of Gumbo Limbos. Just wanted add to the photos already submitted.
Signature: Ellen

Tropical Weevil: Brentus anchorago

Tropical Weevil: Brentus anchorago

Hi Ellen,
Thanks for sending us another image of this unusually shaped Tropical Weevil,
Brentus anchoragoWe have an older image of Brentus anchorago that was also photographed in Key Largo.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Some kind of moth?
Location: North shore of Lake Erie
September 11, 2013 2:17 pm
Wondering what it is. Love it’s camouflage!
Signature: BeeJay

Underwing Moth

Underwing Moth

Dear BeeJay,
While this Underwing Moth in the genus Catocala stands out against the painted blue wall, if it had landed on a tree trunk, it would be nearly invisible like this Walnut Underwing on a carob tree at our Mount Washington, Los Angeles office.  The camouflage you mentioned is even more pronounced if you consider the coloration of the moth’s underwings, which are often brightly colored like this Underwing.  When the moth is startled and takes flight, the bright colors are quite noticeable, and a predator, like a bird, would be searching for those colors and overlook the Underwing once it lands again on a matching trunk.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What are these bees?
Location: Cleveland, OH
September 11, 2013 5:47 pm
Hi Bugman,
These guys have been all over my rose mallow flowers for the last few days in the evening (5-7pm). They zip around quickly until they decide on a flower, spend about 10-20 seconds inside, and emerge covered in pink pollen. They are about 3/4 inch long. They don’t seem to be very interested in the other kinds of flowers in the yard. This is in Cleveland, OH, about a half mile from Lake Erie, on the side of the house facing the lake. It has also been very warm here for the last couple of days — upper 80/lower 90 temps. Thanks very much for your help!
Signature: Laura

Metallic Sweat Bee

Metallic Sweat Bee

Dear Laura,
This is a Metallic Sweat Bee in the family Halictidae.  There are numerous species that look quite similar.  See BugGuide for additional information.  Here is a Metallic Sweat Bee sent in exactly two years ago that reminds us very much of your image.

Hi again, I do think I’ve now managed to identify these as Metallic Sweat Bees, thanks to your wonderfully informative site.

Metallic Sweat Bee

Metallic Sweat Bee

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Another half bee half fly.
Location: Midwestern United States
September 11, 2013 6:32 pm
I can’t identify this insect. Any help?
Signature: Josh

Fruit Fly: Eurosta comma

Fruit Fly: Eurosta comma

Dear Josh,
Your photo isn’t that sharp, but based on this image from BugGuide, we believe this is a Fruit Fly,
Eurosta comma.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination